Five questions answered on the rise in first time buyers

How big is it and what does it mean?

There has been a big boost in the number of mortgages taken out by first time buyers, according to the Council of Mortgage Lenders (CML). We answer five questions on the rise.

How many more first time buyers are there?

According to the CML, the number of mortgages taken out by first time buyers has risen by 42per cent in a year.

What has caused this surge in first time buying? 

Mortgage brokers say it is proof that banks are lending again to first time buyers following government attempts to support the housing market.

Government schemes such as Funding for Lending, which offered £80 billion to banks to boost mortgage and business lending, have increased high loan-to-value lending.

The Help to Buy scheme launched in the March Budget, which is designed to help borrowers with small budgets, has also bolstered loans.

How many first time mortgages were actually approved this year compared to last?

In May, 25,100 first time buyer loans were approved, a rise of 29 per cent from April, and 42 per cent higher than May last year.

At its lowest figure just 8,500 loans were issued to first time buyers in January 2009.

A separate survey released today by e.surv reveals that June showed a total of 7,046 loans were approved to borrowers with deposits of 15 per cent or less – up from 4,790 loans at this level in June.

Total lending to home-buyers was up 23 per cent year-on-year, e.surv found. 

What are people saying?

Richard Sexton, director of e.surv, told The Telegraph: “Last year the lending market was thorny for first-time buyers. But over the last year, lenders have softened the process for them to get a house purchase loan.

“Buoyed by Funding for Lending [the Government scheme], and having had enough time to adjust to regulatory requirements and balance sheet restructurings, banks are more prepared to lend at these levels.”

What next – will the figure continue to rise?

Possibly. The Bank of England’s Credit Condition Survey suggests lenders are planning to increase their lending levels to buyers with a 10 per cent deposit in the third quarter of the year.

Messrs Cameron and Clegg accompany a first time buyer around her new neighbourhood. Photograph: Getty Images.

Heidi Vella is a features writer for Nridigital.com

Photo: Getty
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Can Philip Hammond save the Conservatives from public anger at their DUP deal?

The Chancellor has the wriggle room to get close to the DUP's spending increase – but emotion matters more than facts in politics.

The magic money tree exists, and it is growing in Northern Ireland. That’s the attack line that Labour will throw at Theresa May in the wake of her £1bn deal with the DUP to keep her party in office.

It’s worth noting that while £1bn is a big deal in terms of Northern Ireland’s budget – just a touch under £10bn in 2016/17 – as far as the total expenditure of the British government goes, it’s peanuts.

The British government spent £778bn last year – we’re talking about spending an amount of money in Northern Ireland over the course of two years that the NHS loses in pen theft over the course of one in England. To match the increase in relative terms, you’d be looking at a £35bn increase in spending.

But, of course, political arguments are about gut instinct rather than actual numbers. The perception that the streets of Antrim are being paved by gold while the public realm in England, Scotland and Wales falls into disrepair is a real danger to the Conservatives.

But the good news for them is that last year Philip Hammond tweaked his targets to give himself greater headroom in case of a Brexit shock. Now the Tories have experienced a shock of a different kind – a Corbyn shock. That shock was partly due to the Labour leader’s good campaign and May’s bad campaign, but it was also powered by anger at cuts to schools and anger among NHS workers at Jeremy Hunt’s stewardship of the NHS. Conservative MPs have already made it clear to May that the party must not go to the country again while defending cuts to school spending.

Hammond can get to slightly under that £35bn and still stick to his targets. That will mean that the DUP still get to rave about their higher-than-average increase, while avoiding another election in which cuts to schools are front-and-centre. But whether that deprives Labour of their “cuts for you, but not for them” attack line is another question entirely. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.

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