Five questions answered on Ofcom’s broadband changes

Is it really going to change things that much?

Independent regulator and competition authority for the UK, Ofcom, has proposed new measures that they say will improve broadband deals for consumers. We answer five questions about the proposal.

What are the main proposals Ofcom is making?

In order to promote competition among providers and pass on savings to the customer, the regulatory body is proposing to cut the costs paid by broadband providers when switching customers, as well as shortening the minimum length of contracts.

It wants to cut the cost of switching to between £10 and £15, as well as reducing the minimum contract length to one month.

Currently, providers who use BT's superfast Openreach network must pay BT £50 if they want to switch a customer on to their service.

What has prompted these proposals?

In a recent report, Ofcom stated that upgrading from regular broadband connections to superfast – which is delivered through fibre-optic cables – was cheaper and is becoming increasingly popular. However, it said that switching from one user to another is expensive.

What has BT said about Ofcom’s proposals?

In a statement BT, which offers the BT superfast Openreach network, said it welcomed the plan: "We are pleased that Ofcom is maintaining pricing freedom for Openreach's fibre products.

"BT has already accepted a long payback period for its fibre deployment and its wholesale fibre prices - which are amongst the lowest in Europe - reflect this".

What do the experts say?

Marie-Louise Abretti broadband expert at uSwitch.com, speaking to the BBC said: "Targeting the market at wholesale level - offering monetary savings to broadband providers that are switching people - means it'll be up to ISPs [internet service providers] to make sure that cost savings are passed on to their customers.

"And with providers potentially saving up to £40 per customer, per switch, Ofcom must ensure this happens. We'd hope this move will see often hefty set-up fees scrapped, or at least reduced."

How many people in the UK currently use superfast broadband?

Only around 13 per cent of the UK has superfast broadband connection.

Photograph: Getty Images

Heidi Vella is a features writer for Nridigital.com

Photo: Getty Images/Christopher Furlong
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A dozen defeated parliamentary candidates back Caroline Flint for deputy

Supporters of all the leadership candidates have rallied around Caroline Flint's bid to be deputy leader.

Twelve former parliamentary candidates have backed Caroline Flint's bid to become deputy leader in an open letter to the New Statesman. Dubbing the Don Valley MP a "fantastic campaigner", they explain that why despite backing different candidates for the leadership, they "are united in supporting Caroline Flint to be Labour's next deputy leader", who they describe as a "brilliant communicator and creative policy maker". 

Flint welcomed the endorsement, saying: "our candidates know better than most what it takes to win the sort of seats Labour must gain in order to win a general election, so I'm delighted to have their support.". She urged Labour to rebuild "not by lookin to the past, but by learning from the past", saying that "we must rediscover Labour's voice, especially in communities wher we do not have a Labour MP:".

The Flint campaign will hope that the endorsement provides a boost as the campaign enters its final days.

The full letter is below:

There is no route to Downing Street that does not run through the seats we fought for Labour at the General Election.

"We need a new leadership team that can win back Labour's lost voters.

Although we are backing different candidates to be Leader, we are united in supporting Caroline Flint to be Labour's next deputy leader.

Not only is Caroline a fantastic campaigner, who toured the country supporting Labour's candidates, she's also a brilliant communicator and creative policy maker, which is exactly what we need in our next deputy leader.

If Labour is to win the next election, it is vital that we pick a leadership team that doesn't just appeal to Labour Party members, but is capable of winning the General Election. Caroline Flint is our best hope of beating the Tories.

We urge Labour Party members and supporters to unite behind Caroline Flint and begin the process of rebuilding to win in 2020.

Jessica Asato (Norwich North), Will Straw (Rossendale and Darween), Nick Bent (Warrington South), Mike Le Surf (South Basildon and East Thurrock), Tris Osborne (Chatham and Aylesford), Victoria Groulef (Reading West), Jamie Hanley (Pudsey), Kevin McKeever (Northampton South), Joy Squires (Worcester), Paul Clark (Gillingham and Rainham), Patrick Hall (Bedford) and Mary Wimbury (Aberconwy)

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.