RBS is in the doghouse again

Needs to hold £13.6bn cash.

RBS is in the doghouse yet again after the Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA), the Bank of England’s new banking regulator, announced that despite their best efforts five of the biggest UK banks will need to find an additional £13bn capital to cover their risks.  

To put it in perspective, that's twice the amount the PRA said RBS would have to come up when it released its report at the end of 2012. Back then the PRA named RBS as the worst offender in a list of top banks and building societies needing to fill a £27bn hole in their balance sheets. Yep, you heard that right. Banks are being told that should both be lending out more money to get the economy moving while at the same time being told they need to shore up their cash reserves in case everything goes to hell again. And in a timely manner, the Conservatives have an election to win soon.

Just to make RBS look even worse this news came in hot on the heels of George Osborne’s self-satisfied announcement that 39 per cent tax-payer owned Lloyds is ready for full re-privatisation while RBS may need to be split into a "good" and "bad" bank before it can be sold off. I’ll leave it to you to figure out which part the tax payer will be left with.

RBS alone accounts for £13.6bn of the total outstanding cash that banks need to hold. Making up the remainder are Lloyds Banking Group, Barclays, Co-operative Bank and Nationwide Building Society.

All of the banks, the PRA admits, have put good plans in to collect together the required capital but the regulator is coming to wildly different conclusions about how much the banks will actually save. According to the PRA actions planned by RBS in 2013 would reduce this gap to £3.2bn. However, RBS has said by its own estimate the shortfall was scheduled to be £400m by the end of the year.

Doesn’t a calculation difference of £2.8bn from two government controlled operations just fill you with confidence?

Photograph: Getty Images

Billy Bambrough writes for Retail Banker International at VRL financial news.
 

Getty
Show Hide image

Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

0800 7318496