The next twist in the Apple vs Samsung battle

US ITC rules that Apple infringed on Samsung patent rights.

 

The Samsung vs. Apple battle took another twist yesterday when the US International Trade Commission (ITC) ruled that Apple had infringed on Samsung patent rights.

This could mean a ban on the sale of certain Apple products in the US. Fortunately for Apple this ban would only relate to older models, most notably the iPhone 4 and the Ipad 2.

"We believe the ITC's final determination has confirmed Apple's history of free-riding on Samsung's technological innovations", a Samsung statement said.

Apple has already announced that they will appeal the ITC ruling. The ITC’s ban is also subject to review by the US President. The president can overturn it on public policy grounds, though this is considered unlikely. Apple can continue selling the devices during this review period which lasts up to 60 days.

The worldwide smart phone market is believed to be worth over $290bn. Although Apple dominated the market in 2012, Samsung outsold Apple by 2 to 1 in the first 3 months of 2013.  This shows that a shift may be occurring.

Samsung of course uses the Google Android system which is becoming more popular all the time. According to research firm Gartner, Android accounted for 66 per cent of global smart phone users in 2012, compared to 4 per cent in 2009, whilst Apple’s iOS operating system accounted for 19 per cent of the market in 2012, compared to 14 per cent in 2009.

Apple’s iOS system is of course only available from Apple products whereas Android is used by multiple brands including Samsung, Sony and HTC. Android can also be uploaded onto other devices including: laptops, netbooks, smartbooks, smart TVs, smart watches and cameras.

Notably, major tablet providers such as Google Nexus and Amazon also use Android. According to research form IDC, Apple accounted for 40 per cent of worldwide tablet sales in the first quarter of 2013, compared to 58 per cent in the first quarter of 2012. Android, on the other hand, had increased its market share from 39 per cent to 57 per cent over this same period.

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Andrew Amoils is a writer for WealthInsight

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Grandpa was ill and wasn’t keen on climbing the volcano – but we forced him up all the same

I squinted. Apart from a gleam of turquoise, the view was of one big cloud. Slowly the words started to form in my head. Just. Like. Scotland.

At first, Grandpa was sceptical about the volcano. “I used to be into that kind of thing,” he said, “but not now.” He did not mention that he was 88.

The guidebook to Indonesia – which he disdained – described how, once you got to the crater, the mist would rise to reveal a shimmering lake. His fellow travellers, my sister and I, often joked about our family’s tendency to declare everything to be “just like Scotland”. This was a living, breathing volcano. It would be nothing like Scotland.

But as Grandpa reminisced about his childhood in the Dutch East Indies, he began to warm to the idea. We set off at 7am and drove past villages with muddled terracotta roofs and rice paddies spread across the valleys like glimmering tables. We talked excitedly about our adventure. Then it began to rain. “Perhaps it will blow over,” I said to my sister, as the view from the windows turned into smears.

Our driver stopped at a car park. With remarkable efficiency, he opened the doors for us and drove away. The rain was like gunfire.

To get to the crater, we had to climb into an open-sided minibus where we sat shivering in our wet summer clothes. Grandpa coughed. It was a nasty cough, which seemed to be getting worse; we had been trying to persuade him to go to a pharmacy for days. Instead, we had persuaded him up a cold and wet mountain.

Five minutes passed, and the minibus didn’t budge. Then another bedraggled family squeezed in. I thought of all the would-be volcano tourists curled up in their hotels.

“Look,” I said to the attendant. “My grandfather is not well. Can we please start?”

He shook his head. “Not till all seats are full.” We exchanged a glance with the other family and paid for the empty seats. The driver set off immediately.

The minibus charged up a road through the jungle, bouncing from puddle to puddle. Grandpa pulled out his iPhone and took a selfie.

The summit was even colder, wetter, rainier and more unpleasant. We paid a small fortune to borrow an umbrella and splashed towards the lake. My sister stopped by a fence.

“Where is it?” I said.

“I think . . . this is it,” she replied.

I squinted. Apart from a gleam of turquoise, the view was of one big cloud. Slowly the words started to form in my head. Just. Like. Scotland.

I thought remorsefully of the guidebook, how I’d put my sightseeing greed before my grandfather’s health. Then I noticed the sign: “Danger! Do not approach the sulphur if you have breathing problems.”

Grandpa, still coughing, was holding the umbrella. He beckoned me to join him. I didn’t know it then, but when we made it back to the car, he would be the first to warm up and spend the journey back telling us stories of surviving the war.

But at that moment, in the dreich rain, he gave me some advice I won’t forget.

“If anyone tells you to go and see a volcano,” he said, “you can tell them to fuck off.” 

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

This article first appeared in the 23 March 2017 issue of the New Statesman, Trump's permanent revolution