The next twist in the Apple vs Samsung battle

US ITC rules that Apple infringed on Samsung patent rights.

 

The Samsung vs. Apple battle took another twist yesterday when the US International Trade Commission (ITC) ruled that Apple had infringed on Samsung patent rights.

This could mean a ban on the sale of certain Apple products in the US. Fortunately for Apple this ban would only relate to older models, most notably the iPhone 4 and the Ipad 2.

"We believe the ITC's final determination has confirmed Apple's history of free-riding on Samsung's technological innovations", a Samsung statement said.

Apple has already announced that they will appeal the ITC ruling. The ITC’s ban is also subject to review by the US President. The president can overturn it on public policy grounds, though this is considered unlikely. Apple can continue selling the devices during this review period which lasts up to 60 days.

The worldwide smart phone market is believed to be worth over $290bn. Although Apple dominated the market in 2012, Samsung outsold Apple by 2 to 1 in the first 3 months of 2013.  This shows that a shift may be occurring.

Samsung of course uses the Google Android system which is becoming more popular all the time. According to research firm Gartner, Android accounted for 66 per cent of global smart phone users in 2012, compared to 4 per cent in 2009, whilst Apple’s iOS operating system accounted for 19 per cent of the market in 2012, compared to 14 per cent in 2009.

Apple’s iOS system is of course only available from Apple products whereas Android is used by multiple brands including Samsung, Sony and HTC. Android can also be uploaded onto other devices including: laptops, netbooks, smartbooks, smart TVs, smart watches and cameras.

Notably, major tablet providers such as Google Nexus and Amazon also use Android. According to research form IDC, Apple accounted for 40 per cent of worldwide tablet sales in the first quarter of 2013, compared to 58 per cent in the first quarter of 2012. Android, on the other hand, had increased its market share from 39 per cent to 57 per cent over this same period.

Photograph: Getty Images

Andrew Amoils is a writer for WealthInsight

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#Match4Lara: Lara has found her match, but the search for mixed-race donors isn't over

A UK blood cancer charity has seen an "unprecedented spike" in donors from mixed race and ethnic minority backgrounds since the campaign started. 

Lara Casalotti, the 24-year-old known round the world for her family's race to find her a stem cell donor, has found her match. As long as all goes ahead as planned, she will undergo a transplant in March.

Casalotti was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia in December, and doctors predicted that she would need a stem cell transplant by April. As I wrote a few weeks ago, her Thai-Italian heritage was a stumbling block, both thanks to biology (successful donors tend to fit your racial profile), and the fact that mixed-race people only make up around 3 per cent of international stem cell registries. The number of non-mixed minorities is also relatively low. 

That's why Casalotti's family launched a high profile campaign in the US, Thailand, Italy and the US to encourage more people - especially those from mixed or minority backgrounds - to register. It worked: the family estimates that upwards of 20,000 people have signed up through the campaign in less than a month.

Anthony Nolan, the blood cancer charity, also reported an "unprecedented spike" of donors from black, Asian, ethcnic minority or mixed race backgrounds. At certain points in the campaign over half of those signing up were from these groups, the highest proportion ever seen by the charity. 

Interestingly, it's not particularly likely that the campaign found Casalotti her match. Patient confidentiality regulations protect the nationality and identity of the donor, but Emily Rosselli from Anthony Nolan tells me that most patients don't find their donors through individual campaigns: 

 It’s usually unlikely that an individual finds their own match through their own campaign purely because there are tens of thousands of tissue types out there and hundreds of people around the world joining donor registers every day (which currently stand at 26 million).

Though we can't know for sure, it's more likely that Casalotti's campaign will help scores of people from these backgrounds in future, as it has (and may continue to) increased donations from much-needed groups. To that end, the Match4Lara campaign is continuing: the family has said that drives and events over the next few weeks will go ahead. 

You can sign up to the registry in your country via the Match4Lara website here.

Barbara Speed is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman and a staff writer at CityMetric.