The mining industry is about to fall into a very deep hole

But there could be light at the end of the tunnel.

The mining industry finds itself in a very deep hole after new data from China.

China’s May figures show a dawdling second quarter in the world’s second largest economy. The effect was imminent on the Indian Rupee and the Australian dollar, but the biggest blow was delivered at mining companies, which fell 0.7 per cent. Commodity prices crippled from Australia to South Africa and Standard & Poor’s GSCI gauge of 24 raw materials dropped 0.5 per cent.

This whirlwind of data has sent tremors through mining companies everywhere, from board room to base camp. But why should this matter here in Britain, where mining is something more nostalgic than material?

The irony is that as Britain has lost all its mines, it has gained more mining companies. London has become the commodity centre of the world through the London Metal Exchange and, as a result, has some of the world’s largest mining companies: Anglo American, Glencore Xstrata and Rio Tinto are all listed here.

Aside from China’s depressing figures, it has not been a good spring for London’s listed miners. ENRC, the London listed Kazakh mining group is under investigation by the Serious Fraud Office for multiple counts of corruption while Bumi, already a boardroom battle ground, announced last week that it has “lost” $201m. Following these allegations, there are calls for the FSA to keep a closer eye on these UK-listed mining companies – that means more regulation.

But perhaps it is not all doom and gloom for London miners. Like with the banking industry, forced competition on the one hand and tighter regulation on the other might see a turnaround in an industry mired in controversy.

Photograph: Getty Images

Oliver Williams is an analyst at WealthInsight and writes for VRL Financial News

Oli Scarff/ Getty
Show Hide image

Andy Burnham's full speech on attack: "Manchester is waking up to the most difficult of dawns"

"We are grieving today, but we are strong."

Following Monday night's terror attack on an Ariana Grande concert at the Manchester Arena, newly elected mayor of the city Andy Burnham, gave a speech outside Manchester Town Hall on Tuesday morning, the full text of which is below: 

After our darkest of nights, Manchester is today waking up to the most difficult of dawns. 

It’s hard to believe what has happened here in the last few hours and to put into words the shock, anger and hurt that we feel today.

These were children, young people and their families that those responsible chose to terrorise and kill.

This was an evil act. Our first thoughts are with the families of those killed and injured. And we will do whatever we can to support them.

We are grieving today, but we are strong. Today it will be business as usual as far as possible in our great city.

I want to thank the hundreds of police, fire and ambulance staff who worked throughout the night in the most difficult circumstances imaginable.

We have had messages of support from cities around the country and across the world, and we want to thank them for that.

But lastly I wanted to thank the people of Manchester. Even in the minute after the attack, they opened their doors to strangers and drove them away from danger.

They gave the best possible immediate response to those who seek to divide us and it will be that spirit of Manchester that will prevail and hold us together.

0800 7318496