Just how many banks do we need?

Creating more banks is not necessarily the answer.

According to Greg Clark, financial secretary to the Treasury, the current number of banks in the UK is unacceptable. Says Clark: “we need more banks.” The co-founder of Metro Bank, Anthony Thomson, is singing from the same song sheet. Speaking at a conference last week, Thomson forecast that we will see between five and 15 new banks over the next three to five years. Let’s get real. There are immense barriers to setting up a new bank – as indeed there should be. If we witness two or three new banks over the next three years up and running, that would be a result.

Love them or loathe them, Tesco is one of the world’s most successful retailers, if you forgive it their disastrous foray into the US and the millions lost on its Fresh & Easy project. Even Tesco has found the launch of a current account product in the UK a major challenge. For the past year or more, Tesco has been working on rolling out a current account. We are still waiting to see what the Tesco Bank current account will look like. And this from a banking unit with deep pockets and led by Benny Higgins, arguably one of the leading retail bankers of his generation.

There are currently 17 separate providers of current accounts in the UK. The Tesco Bank launch, slated for the third quarter, will take us to 18. Additional competition is also coming from Bank of Ireland; it is to run three current accounts on behalf of The Post Office. The Post Office is currently trialing its new current account products across 29 branches across Essex and East Anglia ahead of a nationwide launch.

Within government, there seems to be a belief that making it easier for new banks to launch will somehow improve standards as a result of an increase in competition. What the country certainly could with is more responsible banks….an increase in innovation, perhaps. More transparent pricing would help for a start.

If the banks are really to serve the economy, the government has no option but to ensure that they are well -capitalised banks: by its nature, the need to be well capitalised will make it more difficult for new entrants to launch. The argument that we simply need more banks seems to this writer to be not proven.

 

Douglas Blakey is the editor of Retail Banker International

Getty Images.
Show Hide image

Tom Watson rouses Labour's conference as he comes out fighting

The party's deputy leader exhilarated delegates with his paean to the Blair and Brown years. 

Tom Watson is down but not out. After Jeremy Corbyn's second landslide victory, and weeks of threats against his position, Labour's deputy leader could have played it safe. Instead, he came out fighting. 

With Corbyn seated directly behind him, he declared: "I don't know why we've been focusing on what was wrong with the Blair and Brown governments for the last six years. But trashing our record is not the way to enhance our brand. We won't win elections like that! And we need to win elections!" As Watson won a standing ovation from the hall and the platform, the Labour leader remained motionless. When a heckler interjected, Watson riposted: "Jeremy, I don't think she got the unity memo." Labour delegates, many of whom hail from the pre-Corbyn era, lapped it up.

Though he warned against another challenge to the leader ("we can't afford to keep doing this"), he offered a starkly different account of the party's past and its future. He reaffirmed Labour's commitment to Nato ("a socialist construct"), with Corbyn left isolated as the platform applauded. The only reference to the leader came when Watson recalled his recent PMQs victory over grammar schools. There were dissenting voices (Watson was heckled as he praised Sadiq Khan for winning an election: "Just like Jeremy Corbyn!"). But one would never have guessed that this was the party which had just re-elected Corbyn. 

There was much more to Watson's speech than this: a fine comic riff on "Saturday's result" (Ed Balls on Strictly), a spirited attack on Theresa May's "ducking and diving; humming and hahing" and a cerebral account of the automation revolution. But it was his paean to Labour history that roused the conference as no other speaker has. 

The party's deputy channelled the spirit of both Hugh Gaitskell ("fight, and fight, and fight again to save the party we love") and his mentor Gordon Brown (emulating his trademark rollcall of New Labour achivements). With his voice cracking, Watson recalled when "from the sunny uplands of increasing prosperity social democratic government started to feel normal to the people of Britain". For Labour, a party that has never been further from power in recent decades, that truly was another age. But for a brief moment, Watson's tubthumper allowed Corbyn's vanquished opponents to relive it. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.