Has Digg come up with the next Google Reader?

Struggling to replace Google's "most useful tool".

With Google Reader now just two weeks away from being smothered with a virtual pillow by the powers that be at the world's biggest media company, Digg may be coming to the rescue with an alternative.

Social Media site Digg says it has a five-person development team working on a "freemium" alternative (meaning presumably that it will ultimately have some paid-for elements).

The new reader is due to launch on 26 June and will, Digg says offer the following:

  • Easy migration and onboarding from Google Reader.
  • A clean reading experience that gets out of the way and puts the focus squarely on the articles, posts, images, and videos themselves.
  • Useful mobile apps that sync with the web experience.
  • Support for key actions like subscribing, sharing, saving and organizing.

It sounds perfect, so lets hope it works. As Jon Bernstein noted a few months ago, Google Reader is - for many journalists - Google's most useful tool.

For many, Twitter has replaced the RSS reader. And it is certainly true that Twitter is a much better place to go for breaking news because it disseminates stories before they have been turned  into polished prose.

But RSS readers remain for many - myself included - an essential way to keep tabs on the news agenda.

So far I have yet to find a replacement for Google Reader which is anything like as good. Feedly and Flipboard are the two sites which seem to be most widely cited as Google Reader replacements but I find both over-designed and cumbersome compared with the streamlined effortless efficiency of Google Reader (which I mainly use as a widget which sits on my phone).

Here's hoping that Digg's new service fits the bill. In the mean time, can anyone recommend another Google Reader replacement which is as simple and effective as the original?

Google HQ. Photograph: Getty Images

Dominic Ponsford is editor of Press Gazette

Photo: Getty
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Who will win the Copeland by-election?

Labour face a tricky task in holding onto the seat. 

What’s the Copeland by-election about? That’s the question that will decide who wins it.

The Conservatives want it to be about the nuclear industry, which is the seat’s biggest employer, and Jeremy Corbyn’s long history of opposition to nuclear power.

Labour want it to be about the difficulties of the NHS in Cumbria in general and the future of West Cumberland Hospital in particular.

Who’s winning? Neither party is confident of victory but both sides think it will be close. That Theresa May has visited is a sign of the confidence in Conservative headquarters that, win or lose, Labour will not increase its majority from the six-point lead it held over the Conservatives in May 2015. (It’s always more instructive to talk about vote share rather than raw numbers, in by-elections in particular.)

But her visit may have been counterproductive. Yes, she is the most popular politician in Britain according to all the polls, but in visiting she has added fuel to the fire of Labour’s message that the Conservatives are keeping an anxious eye on the outcome.

Labour strategists feared that “the oxygen” would come out of the campaign if May used her visit to offer a guarantee about West Cumberland Hospital. Instead, she refused to answer, merely hyping up the issue further.

The party is nervous that opposition to Corbyn is going to supress turnout among their voters, but on the Conservative side, there is considerable irritation that May’s visit has made their task harder, too.

Voters know the difference between a by-election and a general election and my hunch is that people will get they can have a free hit on the health question without risking the future of the nuclear factory. That Corbyn has U-Turned on nuclear power only helps.

I said last week that if I knew what the local paper would look like between now and then I would be able to call the outcome. Today the West Cumbria News & Star leads with Downing Street’s refusal to answer questions about West Cumberland Hospital. All the signs favour Labour. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.