Five questions answered on the Airbus A350

A successful maiden test flight.

Airbus’s newest plane, the Airbus A350, successfully completed its first flight today. We answer five questions on the latest in plane technology.

Where did the Airbus A350 go on its maiden test flight?

The plane took off from Blagnac, in the French city of Toulouse this morning and after a four hour trip landed back there at 1pm this afternoon.

What’s special about the Airbus A350?

It is designed to be more fuel efficient – something that is very important to modern aviation with the high cost of fuel – using 25 per cent less fuel than previous generation wide-bodied aircraft. It is also a direct competitor to Boeing's 787 Dreamliner and is said to be pivotal to the future of Airbus.

Have airbus received any orders for the A350 yet?

Yes. The European aviation company has taken more than 600 orders for the new plane. It aims to deliver them by 2014.

What other key components are there about the A350?

Its engine is made by Rolls-Royce and it is made of advanced material such as carbon which help save on weight.

Some of its parts are also made in the UK, such as the plane's wings which were designed at an Airbus facility in Filton near Bristol. They are manufactured at Broughton in Wales.

What are the aviation experts saying?

"All recent programmes before it, both by Airbus, Boeing and others, have had reasonably horrendous technical problems and delays," said Nick Cunningham, an aviation analyst at the London-based Agency Partners, speaking to French agency AFP.

"So every time you hit a milestone (such as a test flight), it's good news because it means that you've missed an opportunity to have another big delay."

Photograph: Getty Images

Heidi Vella is a features writer for Nridigital.com

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Could Jeremy Corbyn still be excluded from the leadership race? The High Court will rule today

Labour donor Michael Foster has applied for a judgement. 

If you thought Labour's National Executive Committee's decision to let Jeremy Corbyn automatically run again for leader was the end of it, think again. 

Today, the High Court will decide whether the NEC made the right judgement - or if Corbyn should have been forced to seek nominations from 51 MPs, which would effectively block him from the ballot.

The legal challenge is brought by Michael Foster, a Labour donor and former parliamentary candidate. Corbyn is listed as one of the defendants.

Before the NEC decision, both Corbyn's team and the rebel MPs sought legal advice.

Foster has maintained he is simply seeking the views of experts. 

Nevertheless, he has clashed with Corbyn before. He heckled the Labour leader, whose party has been racked with anti-Semitism scandals, at a Labour Friends of Israel event in September 2015, where he demanded: "Say the word Israel."

But should the judge decide in favour of Foster, would the Labour leadership challenge really be over?

Dr Peter Catterall, a reader in history at Westminster University and a specialist in opposition studies, doesn't think so. He said: "The Labour party is a private institution, so unless they are actually breaking the law, it seems to me it is about how you interpret the rules of the party."

Corbyn's bid to be personally mentioned on the ballot paper was a smart move, he said, and the High Court's decision is unlikely to heal wounds.

 "You have to ask yourself, what is the point of doing this? What does success look like?" he said. "Will it simply reinforce the idea that Mr Corbyn is being made a martyr by people who are out to get him?"