Five questions answered on the Airbus A350

A successful maiden test flight.

Airbus’s newest plane, the Airbus A350, successfully completed its first flight today. We answer five questions on the latest in plane technology.

Where did the Airbus A350 go on its maiden test flight?

The plane took off from Blagnac, in the French city of Toulouse this morning and after a four hour trip landed back there at 1pm this afternoon.

What’s special about the Airbus A350?

It is designed to be more fuel efficient – something that is very important to modern aviation with the high cost of fuel – using 25 per cent less fuel than previous generation wide-bodied aircraft. It is also a direct competitor to Boeing's 787 Dreamliner and is said to be pivotal to the future of Airbus.

Have airbus received any orders for the A350 yet?

Yes. The European aviation company has taken more than 600 orders for the new plane. It aims to deliver them by 2014.

What other key components are there about the A350?

Its engine is made by Rolls-Royce and it is made of advanced material such as carbon which help save on weight.

Some of its parts are also made in the UK, such as the plane's wings which were designed at an Airbus facility in Filton near Bristol. They are manufactured at Broughton in Wales.

What are the aviation experts saying?

"All recent programmes before it, both by Airbus, Boeing and others, have had reasonably horrendous technical problems and delays," said Nick Cunningham, an aviation analyst at the London-based Agency Partners, speaking to French agency AFP.

"So every time you hit a milestone (such as a test flight), it's good news because it means that you've missed an opportunity to have another big delay."

Photograph: Getty Images

Heidi Vella is a features writer for Nridigital.com

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.