Five questions answered on the Airbus A350

A successful maiden test flight.

Airbus’s newest plane, the Airbus A350, successfully completed its first flight today. We answer five questions on the latest in plane technology.

Where did the Airbus A350 go on its maiden test flight?

The plane took off from Blagnac, in the French city of Toulouse this morning and after a four hour trip landed back there at 1pm this afternoon.

What’s special about the Airbus A350?

It is designed to be more fuel efficient – something that is very important to modern aviation with the high cost of fuel – using 25 per cent less fuel than previous generation wide-bodied aircraft. It is also a direct competitor to Boeing's 787 Dreamliner and is said to be pivotal to the future of Airbus.

Have airbus received any orders for the A350 yet?

Yes. The European aviation company has taken more than 600 orders for the new plane. It aims to deliver them by 2014.

What other key components are there about the A350?

Its engine is made by Rolls-Royce and it is made of advanced material such as carbon which help save on weight.

Some of its parts are also made in the UK, such as the plane's wings which were designed at an Airbus facility in Filton near Bristol. They are manufactured at Broughton in Wales.

What are the aviation experts saying?

"All recent programmes before it, both by Airbus, Boeing and others, have had reasonably horrendous technical problems and delays," said Nick Cunningham, an aviation analyst at the London-based Agency Partners, speaking to French agency AFP.

"So every time you hit a milestone (such as a test flight), it's good news because it means that you've missed an opportunity to have another big delay."

Photograph: Getty Images

Heidi Vella is a features writer for Nridigital.com

Photo: Getty
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Theresa May is paying the price for mismanaging Boris Johnson

The Foreign Secretary's bruised ego may end up destroying Theresa May. 

And to think that Theresa May scheduled her big speech for this Friday to make sure that Conservative party conference wouldn’t be dominated by the matter of Brexit. Now, thanks to Boris Johnson, it won’t just be her conference, but Labour’s, which is overshadowed by Brexit in general and Tory in-fighting in particular. (One imagines that the Labour leadership will find a way to cope somehow.)

May is paying the price for mismanaging Johnson during her period of political hegemony after she became leader. After he was betrayed by Michael Gove and lacking any particular faction in the parliamentary party, she brought him back from the brink of political death by making him Foreign Secretary, but also used her strength and his weakness to shrink his empire.

The Foreign Office had its responsibility for negotiating Brexit hived off to the newly-created Department for Exiting the European Union (Dexeu) and for navigating post-Brexit trade deals to the Department of International Trade. Johnson was given control of one of the great offices of state, but with no responsibility at all for the greatest foreign policy challenge since the Second World War.

Adding to his discomfort, the new Foreign Secretary was regularly the subject of jokes from the Prime Minister and cabinet colleagues. May likened him to a dog that had to be put down. Philip Hammond quipped about him during his joke-fuelled 2017 Budget. All of which gave Johnson’s allies the impression that Johnson-hunting was a licensed sport as far as Downing Street was concerned. He was then shut out of the election campaign and has continued to be a marginalised figure even as the disappointing election result forced May to involve the wider cabinet in policymaking.

His sense of exclusion from the discussions around May’s Florence speech only added to his sense of isolation. May forgot that if you aren’t going to kill, don’t wound: now, thanks to her lost majority, she can’t afford to put any of the Brexiteers out in the cold, and Johnson is once again where he wants to be: centre-stage. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.