The Fed has a difficult task ahead

Careless talk costs money.

One clings to the hope that Chairman Ben Bernanke and his colleagues at the US Federal Reserve are some of the brightest economists in the world today and hence they know what they are doing because, be in no doubt, they have embarked on an ambitious journey, during which they intend to simultaneously burst bubbles, avoid a bond market rout, and maybe even at the same time encourage banks to use their cash to lend to people and businesses by making government bonds less attractive.

To achieve all of the above at the same time without causing excessive market volatility will indeed be an enormously difficult task. As Andrew Haldane, the Bank of England’s Executive Director for Financial Stability, recently observed rather pointedly, "we have intentionally blown the biggest government bond bubble in history".

Surely recent "Fedspeak", including Bernanke’s bombshell comment that Quantitative Easing, (QE), may be tapered "within the next few meetings" can’t just have been "careless talk". Given the quite extreme effect on US Treasury bond yields, (the 10-year yield climbed by 0.60 per cent in only five weeks), one can be quite certain that by now the Fed would have embarked on a coordinated program intended to correct market perceptions, if the Fed was unhappy with same. This has not happened, but there is just a chance that they take the opportunity next Wednesday at the regular meeting of their monetary policy committee, the FOMC, to do just this. However, I don’t expect this to be the case.

I feel that a large contingent at the Fed has become concerned that bubbles of the kind that brought the financial system to the brink of collapse in 2008 were re-forming and they needed to tackle this sooner rather than later.

The multiple and diverse incidental consequences of their change in rhetoric are plain to see. Credit spreads have widened, emerging markets and currencies have tumbled, and fear rather than greed has the upper hand. Most frustratingly for the Fed’s counterparts at the Bank of Japan, the Yen has strengthened, as its safe-haven status has trumped even their massive quantitative easing and this in turn has caused the Nikkei stock index to collapse.

I’m sure the Fed is watching these developments very closely, but I don’t believe they will be easily deviated from their path, as they fear delay will have far more serious consequences.

Ben Bernanke. Photograph: Getty Images

Chairman of  Saxo Capital Markets Board

An Honours Graduate from Oxford University, Nick Beecroft has over 30 years of international trading experience within the financial industry, including senior Global Markets roles at Standard Chartered Bank, Deutsche Bank and Citibank. Nick was a member of the Bank of England's Foreign Exchange Joint Standing Committee.

More of his work can be found here.

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Theresa May knows she's talking nonsense - here's why she's doing it

The Prime Minister's argument increases the sense that this is a time to "lend" - in her words - the Tories your vote.

Good morning.  Angela Merkel and Theresa May are more similar politicians than people think, and that holds true for Brexit too. The German Chancellor gave a speech yesterday, and the message: Brexit means Brexit.

Of course, the emphasis is slightly different. When May says it, it's about reassuring the Brexit elite in SW1 that she isn't going to backslide, and anxious Remainers and soft Brexiteers in the country that it will work out okay in the end.

When Merkel says it, she's setting out what the EU wants and the reality of third country status outside the European Union.  She's also, as with May, tilting to her own party and public opinion in Germany, which thinks that the UK was an awkward partner in the EU and is being even more awkward in the manner of its leaving.

It's a measure of how poor the debate both during the referendum and its aftermath is that Merkel's bland statement of reality - "A third-party state - and that's what Britain will be - can't and won't be able to have the same rights, let alone a better position than a member of the European Union" - feels newsworthy.

In the short term, all this helps Theresa May. Her response - delivered to a carefully-selected audience of Leeds factory workers, the better to avoid awkward questions - that the EU is "ganging up" on Britain is ludicrous if you think about it. A bloc of nations acting in their own interest against their smaller partners - colour me surprised!

But in terms of what May wants out of this election - a massive majority that gives her carte blanche to implement her agenda and puts Labour out of contention for at least a decade - it's a great message. It increases the sense that this is a time to "lend" - in May's words - the Tories your vote. You may be unhappy about the referendum result, you may usually vote Labour - but on this occasion, what's needed is a one-off Tory vote to make Brexit a success.

May's message is silly if you pay any attention to how the EU works or indeed to the internal politics of the EU27. That doesn't mean it won't be effective.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.

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