The Fed has a difficult task ahead

Careless talk costs money.

One clings to the hope that Chairman Ben Bernanke and his colleagues at the US Federal Reserve are some of the brightest economists in the world today and hence they know what they are doing because, be in no doubt, they have embarked on an ambitious journey, during which they intend to simultaneously burst bubbles, avoid a bond market rout, and maybe even at the same time encourage banks to use their cash to lend to people and businesses by making government bonds less attractive.

To achieve all of the above at the same time without causing excessive market volatility will indeed be an enormously difficult task. As Andrew Haldane, the Bank of England’s Executive Director for Financial Stability, recently observed rather pointedly, "we have intentionally blown the biggest government bond bubble in history".

Surely recent "Fedspeak", including Bernanke’s bombshell comment that Quantitative Easing, (QE), may be tapered "within the next few meetings" can’t just have been "careless talk". Given the quite extreme effect on US Treasury bond yields, (the 10-year yield climbed by 0.60 per cent in only five weeks), one can be quite certain that by now the Fed would have embarked on a coordinated program intended to correct market perceptions, if the Fed was unhappy with same. This has not happened, but there is just a chance that they take the opportunity next Wednesday at the regular meeting of their monetary policy committee, the FOMC, to do just this. However, I don’t expect this to be the case.

I feel that a large contingent at the Fed has become concerned that bubbles of the kind that brought the financial system to the brink of collapse in 2008 were re-forming and they needed to tackle this sooner rather than later.

The multiple and diverse incidental consequences of their change in rhetoric are plain to see. Credit spreads have widened, emerging markets and currencies have tumbled, and fear rather than greed has the upper hand. Most frustratingly for the Fed’s counterparts at the Bank of Japan, the Yen has strengthened, as its safe-haven status has trumped even their massive quantitative easing and this in turn has caused the Nikkei stock index to collapse.

I’m sure the Fed is watching these developments very closely, but I don’t believe they will be easily deviated from their path, as they fear delay will have far more serious consequences.

Ben Bernanke. Photograph: Getty Images

Chairman of  Saxo Capital Markets Board

An Honours Graduate from Oxford University, Nick Beecroft has over 30 years of international trading experience within the financial industry, including senior Global Markets roles at Standard Chartered Bank, Deutsche Bank and Citibank. Nick was a member of the Bank of England's Foreign Exchange Joint Standing Committee.

More of his work can be found here.

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With the BBC Food’s collection under threat, here's how to make the most of online recipes

Do a bit of digging, trust your instincts – and always read the comments.

I don’t think John Humphrys is much of a chef. Recently, as his Today co-presenter Mishal Husain was discussing the implications of the BBC’s decision to axe its Food website (since commuted to transportation to the Good Food platform, run by its commercial arm), sharp-eared listeners heard the Humph claim that fewer recipes on the web could only be a good thing. “It would make it easier!” he bellowed in the background. “We wouldn’t have to choose between so many!”

Husain also seemed puzzled as to why anyone would need more than one recipe for spaghetti bolognese – but, as any keen cook knows, you can never have too many different takes on a dish. Just as you wouldn’t want to get all your news from a single source, it would be a sad thing to eat the same bolognese for the rest of your life. Sometimes only a molto autentico version, as laid down by a fierce Italian donna, rich with tradition and chopped liver, will do – and sometimes, though you would never admit it in a national magazine, you crave the comfort of your mum’s spag bol with grated cheddar.

The world wouldn’t starve without BBC Food’s collection but, given that an online search for “spaghetti bolognese recipe” turns up about a million results, it would have been sad to have lost one of the internet’s more trustworthy sources of information. As someone who spends a large part of each week researching and testing recipes, I can assure you that genuinely reliable ones are rarer than decent chips after closing time. But although it is certainly the only place you’ll find the Most Haunted host Yvette Fielding’s kedgeree alongside Heston Blumenthal’s snail porridge, the BBC website is not the only one that is worth your time.

The good thing about newspaper, magazine and other commercial platforms is that most still have just enough budget to ensure that their recipes will have been made at least twice – once by the writer and once for the accompanying photographs – though sadly the days when everyone employed an independent recipe tester are long gone. Such sites also often have sufficient traffic to generate a useful volume of comments. I never make a recipe without scrolling down to see what other people have said about it. Get past the “Can’t wait to make this!” brigade; ignore the annoying people who swap baked beans for lentils and then complain, “This is nothing like dhal”; and there’s usually some sensible advice in there, too.

But what about when you leave the safety of the big boys and venture into the no man’s land of the personal blog? How do you separate the wheat from the chaff and find a recipe that actually works? You can often tell how much work a writer has put in by the level of detail they go into: if they have indicated how many people it serves, or where to find unusual ingredients, suggested possible tweaks and credited their original sources, they have probably made the dish more than once. The photography is another handy clue. You don’t have to be Annie Leibovitz to provide a good idea of what the finished dish ought to look like.

Do a bit of digging as part of your prep. If you like the look of the rest of the site, the author’s tastes will probably chime with your own. And always, always, wherever the recipe is from, read it all the way through, even before you order the shopping. There is nothing more annoying than getting halfway through and then realising that you need a hand blender to finish the dish, just as the first guest arrives.

Above all, trust your instincts. If the cooking time seems far too short, or the salt content ridiculously high, it probably is, so keep an eye on that oven, check that casserole, keep tasting that sauce. As someone who once published a magic mince pie recipe without any sugar, I’m living proof that, occasionally, even the very best of us make mistakes. 

Felicity Cloake is the New Statesman’s food columnist. Her latest book is The A-Z of Eating: a Flavour Map for Adventurous Cooks.

This article first appeared in the 26 May 2016 issue of the New Statesman, The Brexit odd squad