Yahoo buys Tumblr

Part of a wider trend.

Internet giant Yahoo has now announced the purchase of blogging site Tumblr in a $1.1bn (£720m) deal. At a press conference, former Google executive and current Yahoo CEO, Marissa Mayer announced the news in New York’s Times Square, following a meeting with the Yahoo board on Sunday.

Launched from the bedroom of founder David Karp in 2007, Tumblr today boasts 110m users, a similar number to those using Yahoo’s services, and currently hosts 42m blogs on its site. A success story since day one, within a fortnight of its launch, 75,000 bloggers were already logging on regularly.

This acquisition is the latest attempt by Yahoo to shore up its business, having lost much of the market share of its core search business. Once a leading search engine and web portal in the US, Yahoo is attempting to diversify its product offering, following the erosion of several of its products by the rise and rise of rivals Google and Facebook.

Tumblr will give the organisation access to a thriving user base and hopefully steady the ship, after a stormy few years for Yahoo, which has seen six different executives in the top job since 2009, and the workforce cut by 2,000 in 2012. The purchase of the blogging site, plus social news platform Snip.it in January, signal Mayer’s intention to grow through acquisitions.

It marks a wider trend in the technology industry, which has seen a number of large players competing to snap up fast-growing internet start-ups, giving them access to a rapidly expanding user base and new means of communication with their customers.

Mayer has certainly made an impact since her appointment in July 2012, cutting Yahoo’s products from around 60 to just a core of around a dozen, plus a strict new hiring process and the outlawing of working from home. Criticism and praise have been heaped on her in equal measure, but this latest deal could make or break her time at the top, with industry analysts questioning how a company can pay $1.1bn cash for Tumblr, having recorded just £13m in sales in 2012.

Photograph: Getty Images

Mark Brierley is a group editor at Global Trade Media

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#Match4Lara: Lara has found her match, but the search for mixed-race donors isn't over

A UK blood cancer charity has seen an "unprecedented spike" in donors from mixed race and ethnic minority backgrounds since the campaign started. 

Lara Casalotti, the 24-year-old known round the world for her family's race to find her a stem cell donor, has found her match. As long as all goes ahead as planned, she will undergo a transplant in March.

Casalotti was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia in December, and doctors predicted that she would need a stem cell transplant by April. As I wrote a few weeks ago, her Thai-Italian heritage was a stumbling block, both thanks to biology (successful donors tend to fit your racial profile), and the fact that mixed-race people only make up around 3 per cent of international stem cell registries. The number of non-mixed minorities is also relatively low. 

That's why Casalotti's family launched a high profile campaign in the US, Thailand, Italy and the US to encourage more people - especially those from mixed or minority backgrounds - to register. It worked: the family estimates that upwards of 20,000 people have signed up through the campaign in less than a month.

Anthony Nolan, the blood cancer charity, also reported an "unprecedented spike" of donors from black, Asian, ethcnic minority or mixed race backgrounds. At certain points in the campaign over half of those signing up were from these groups, the highest proportion ever seen by the charity. 

Interestingly, it's not particularly likely that the campaign found Casalotti her match. Patient confidentiality regulations protect the nationality and identity of the donor, but Emily Rosselli from Anthony Nolan tells me that most patients don't find their donors through individual campaigns: 

 It’s usually unlikely that an individual finds their own match through their own campaign purely because there are tens of thousands of tissue types out there and hundreds of people around the world joining donor registers every day (which currently stand at 26 million).

Though we can't know for sure, it's more likely that Casalotti's campaign will help scores of people from these backgrounds in future, as it has (and may continue to) increased donations from much-needed groups. To that end, the Match4Lara campaign is continuing: the family has said that drives and events over the next few weeks will go ahead. 

You can sign up to the registry in your country via the Match4Lara website here.

Barbara Speed is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman and a staff writer at CityMetric.