This is why London property is so high right now

But could it be approaching the limit?

London’s prime property world was whipped into a frenzy in Q1 with values growing 13.4 per cent in Kensington & Chelsea compared to 1.7 per cent nationally. But where did the demand originate?

According to Gary Hersham, owner of sales and search agent Beauchamp Estates, Singaporean buyers have benefited handsomely from the exchange rate making central London properties 10 per cent cheaper than five years ago and, further, strengthening of the euro has increased demand from continental buyers, particularly French and Italians.

"The domestic market has also been buoyed by relaxed lending boosted by the launch of the Funding for Lending Scheme in August,"Hersham says in his MarketInsight newsletter. ‘Mortgage approvals are rising and the Council of Mortgage Lenders forecast a further 10 per cent rise in lending in 2013."

Happy news no doubt, but cynics will say that the vertical may be approaching its limit. After all, mean reversion is one of the great truisms of finance and London has, over five years, moved in the opposite direction to the rest of the country, seeing price rises of 6 per cent against national falls of 11 per cent.

The capital’s fortunes depend therefore, says Mayfair’s number-one estate agent, Peter Wetherell, on continued good news on key exchange rates, Government encouragement for overseas investment and strengthening domestic demand. HNWs already invested in London prime will be keeping their fingers crossed, but with the market already well over its pre-crisis highs, the jury is still out.

This story first appeared on Spears magazine.

Photograph: Getty Images

This is a story from the team at Spears magazine.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.