Right-wingers less likely to buy energy saving bulbs if you tell them it helps the environment

Head, meet desk.

This is the saddest thing. Research reported in American scientific journal PNAS finds that right wingers are made less likely to buy an energy-efficient bulb when the purchase was specified as environmentally friendly than when it wasn't.

In the study, one of two carried out by Dena M. Gromet, Howard Kunreuther, and Richard P. Larrick, the researchers offered participants the choice of buying a conventional lightbulb, and an energy-saving one. Every participant was offered "information about the energy efficiency benefits of the CFL bulb compared with the incandescent bulb (e.g., the CFL bulb lasts for 9,000 more hours and reduces energy cost by 75%)," and the experiment was run twice, once with a realistic price difference (50¢ for the incandescent bulb, $1.50 for the CFL) and once with both bulbs at 50¢.

The participants were then split into two groups. One of the groups were given the CFL bulb in a blank box, the other in a box that said "Protect the Environment" on it. The result? Most people except those who were very left-wing were put off by the environmental label. Whereas slightly over half the people offered two blank boxes chose the CFL bulb, people offered the environmental label chose it 80% of the time if they were left-wing, dropping to just 30% if they were right-wing.

It's one thing to see that people on the left politically are more encouraged to protect the environment than people on the right – that's always been known – but it's an entirely different kettle of fish to discover that (American) right-wingers are actively turned off something if they discover it will help the environment. No wonder fighting climate change is so hard.

Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

Getty Images.
Show Hide image

Tory Brexiter Daniel Hannan: Leave campaign never promised "radical decline" in immigration

The voters might not agree...

BBC Newsnight on Twitter

It was the Leave campaign's pledge to reduce EU immigration that won it the referendum. But Daniel Hannan struck a rather different tone on last night's Newsnight. "It means free movement of labour," the Conservative MEP said of the post-Brexit model he envisaged. An exasperated Evan Davis replied: “I’m sorry we’ve just been through three months of agony on the issue of immigration. The public have been led to believe that what they have voted for is an end to free movement." 

Hannan protested that EU migrants would lose "legal entitlements to live in other countries, to vote in other countries and to claim welfare and to have the same university tuition". But Davis wasn't backing down. "Why didn't you say this in the campaign? Why didn't you say in the campaign that you were wanting a scheme where we have free movement of labour? Come on, that's completely at odds with what the public think they have just voted for." 

Hannan concluded: "We never said there was going to be some radical decline ... we want a measure of control". Your Mole suspects many voters assumed otherwise. If immigration is barely changed, Hannan and others will soon be burned by the very fires they stoked. 

I'm a mole, innit.