From today, Google searches will start looking very different in America and Europe

Google and European Commission wrap up antitrust investigation.

Today, Google has come to an agreement with the European Commission over an antitrust investigation that started two years ago: for the first time it will make changes to the way searches are done.

The investigation had four concerns:

1. Google automatically put results from its own company - like Google News or Google Plus Local - ahead of those from rival firms.

2. Google had been scraping content from rivals.

3. Google had made deals with various websites that affected the order of links in a search.

4. Google had made it difficult for advertisers to transfer campaigns to other search engines.

..and has now addressed them in the following way:

1. Google will have to clearly label search results from its own company -  and to run them alongside links from rival companies.

2. Competitors will be able to opt out of Google’s specialist services, without being penalised via search priority.

3. These deals will go.

4. Transferring campaigns will be made easier.

The changes will come in gradually over the next month, leaving time for rivals to state any further problems they have, and will be legally binding for five years. Interestingly though, the changes are to be far more stringent than those made by US regulators, who closed an antitrust investigation back in January after finding Google had not violated any anti-trust statutes. One fall-out of the changes then will be that Google search will look different depending on which side of the Atlantic you are on. Soon, American searchers will be operating in a more Google-centric world than the rest of us.

 

Photograph: Getty Images
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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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