Social care for the elderly will be the first to go in the council cuts

What could replace it? "Adopt-a-granny" schemes, or a National Care Service, maybe.

Recent weeks have seen social security cuts ignite passions and viscerally polarise politics. Benefits reform lit the touch paper for disputes on the future affordability of the welfare state. But pensioner benefits, over half of the total welfare spend, are curiously off the table for discussion.

Yet if anything it is elderly care, rather than jobseekers payments, which will bankrupt the public finances. Constructive debate on the future of adult social services is more urgent than political wrangling on strivers vs. scroungers. Without it we risk sleep walking into a care crisis. 

The looming crisis hasn’t gone unnoticed by government over the past decade, yet no minister has yet arrived at a conclusive response. The latest attempt to grasp the nettle was made in Budget 2013, when the Chancellor agreed to fast track reform to social care funding. The government’s proposals are designed to make the system fairer, by protecting housing assets, but don’t tackle current spending pressure. 

Simply put, through capping individual payments at £72,000 from 2016, the government is addressing the balance of payments between the state and individuals. But the totality of funding will not change.

In response, a prominent Lords Select Committee has declared that the country is still “woefully underprepared for ageing.” Radical changes to the way that health and social care is delivered are needed to provide appropriate care and to address future demand.

Over the next two decades, England will see a 51 per cent rise in those aged 65+ and a doubling of those aged 85+. Many elderly people will be increasingly dependent on the care system. The Local Government Association estimates that this will see an increase in the care bill of £7bn - or about 15 per cent - over the decade. Worryingly, this is a "modest" estimate.

At the same time, until the social care system is reformed, money will continually be sucked out of other local services, such as roads, street cleaning and education support. This reality became apparent during research for NLGN’s latest report Gaming the Cuts, which is launched today. 

To inform the research we conducted a "budget war game" with senior council officers thinking through the implications of the cuts on an imaginary council called AnyBorough. Both teams quickly latched onto integrating health and social care, thinking that substantial savings could be made.

Back in the real world, many local authorities are already looking to bring clinical and public health commissioning together. Essex County Council is pioneering a new joint approach to tackle the £1bn elderly budget it shares with the NHS.

It is estimated that Essex’s new approach could save the public purse £348m by 2017/18. A study commissioned by the Local Government Association suggests that if such approaches were scaled up there could be a 5-year net benefit to the public sector of £5.8-£12bn. 

However, the budget war game made clear that savings from new models would likely flow to the acute sector. As a result, councils may look to the community to provide more social support. 

In England and Wales the informal care economy already accounts for approximately 3.4m working days every week, this is a substantial increase from 10 years ago. During our research it was therefore mooted that the public may have to be paid to deliver social services.

Currently, advocates for increased community involvement in adult social care point to the success of time dollar banking approaches first developed in Japan. Elderly people are befriended in order to combat loneliness and people account for the time spent in such schemes as a currency. They can then trade time to ensure that their own elderly relatives, who often live too far away to visit regularly, are supported.

But what if such Adopt-a-Granny schemes were based on a monetary transaction? Could support for elderly independent living be based on a similar financial footing to the fostering of children, with allowances paid to accredited carers?

Although seemingly radical the principle behind such an approach makes sense. For many people social relations are as important to physical and mental health as social services.

Yet, considerable risk would be transferred onto the community and more money saved would only be a drop in the ocean of the health and adult social care bill. But most importantly, monetisation could have unforeseen consequences on the sense of community and mutual relations that is at the heart of caring. 

With health integration and community care likely to be insufficient we are left with a seemingly intractable situation. Councils are even beginning to raise the possibility of social care spend being taken away from them, through a National Care Service for example, so that they can focus on making investments for local prosperity and growth. Just two years ago this would have been unthinkable, but such is the pressure now facing councils that such heresies are increasingly to be heard whispered around local government.

Photograph: Getty Images

Joe is a senior researcher at the New Local Government Network

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Why Theresa May can't end speculation of an early general election

Both Conservative and Labour MPs regard a contest next year as the solution to their problems. 

One of Theresa May’s first acts as a Conservative leadership candidate was to rule out an early general election. After a tumultuous 2015 contest and the EU referendum, her view was that the country required a period of stability (a view shared by voters). Many newly-elected Tory MPs, fearful of a Brexit-inspired Ukip or Liberal Democrat surge, supported her on this condition.

After entering Downing Street, May reaffirmed her stance. “The Prime Minister could not have been clearer,” a senior source told me. “There won’t be an early election.” Maintaining this pledge is an important part of May’s straight-talking image.

But though No.10 has wisely avoided publicly contemplating an election (unlike Gordon Brown), the question refuses to die. The Conservatives have a majority of just 12 - the smallest of any single-party government since 1974 - and, as David Cameron found, legislative defeats almost inevitably follow. May’s vow to lift the ban on new grammar schools looks to many like an unachievable task. Former education secretary Nicky Morgan and former business minister Anna Soubry are among the Tories leading the charge against the measure (which did not feature in the 2015 Conservative manifesto).  

To this problem, an early election appears to be the solution. The Tories retain a substantial opinion poll lead over Labour, the most divided opposition in recent history. An election victory would give May the mandate for new policies that she presently lacks.

“I don’t believe Theresa May wishes to hold an early election which there is evidence that the country doesn’t want and which, given the current state of the Labour Party, might be seen as opportunistic,” Nigel Lawson told today’s Times“If, however, the government were to find that it couldn’t get its legislation through the House of Commons, then a wholly new situation would arise.”

It is not only Conservatives who are keeping the possibility of an early election alive. Many Labour MPs are pleading for one in the belief that it would end Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership. An early contest would also pre-empt the boundary changes planned in 2018, which are forecast to cost the party 23 seats.

For Corbyn, the possibility of an election is a vital means of disciplining MPs. Allies also hope that the failed revolt against his leadership, which Labour members blame for the party’s unpopularity, would allow him to remain leader even if defeated.

Unlike her predecessors, May faces the obstacle of the Fixed-Term Parliaments Act (under which the next election will be on 7 May 2020). Yet it is not an insurmountable one. The legislation can be suspended with the backing of two-thirds of MPs, or through a vote of no confidence in the government. Alternatively, the act could simply be repealed or amended. Labour and the Liberal Democrats, who have demanded an early election, would struggle to resist May if she called their bluff.

To many, it simply looks like an offer too good to refuse. Which is why, however hard May swats this fly, it will keep coming back. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.