Samsung: all over the news, again

Gotta hand it to their PR team.

Another day and another set of positive Samsung stories, wherever you look.

A special mention goes to the consultants IDC. Last week when Samsung released a strong set of first quarter results – another quarterly record profit – IDC reported that Samsung shipped more smartphones than the next four vendors combined. Even better for Samsung was confirmation that of the top 5 vendors globally, only Apple suffered a drop in market share; LG, Huawei and ZTE made small gains while Samsung’s market share soared.

Although Apple grew sales volume by around 6 percent to 37m phones, its market share fell sharply from 23 per cent to 17 per cent. By contrast, Samsung’s mobile sales skyrocketed by 60 per cent to 70.7m for a 32.7 per cent market share, up from 28.8 per cent ayear ago.

There was a time, not so long ago, when mobile phones were used just to make calls and send texts? It seems a long time ago.

In the UK, 31.7m (out of a total of UK mobile phone audience of 49.5m) are smartphones. UK smartphone penetration stands at 64 per cent and rising. In December, 82 per cent of all phones acquired were smartphones. There is a common misconception that the digital drive is being driven by 20 and 30 somethings, with nothing better to spend their money on than the latest gadget.

Wrong.  In December 2012, 71 per cent of new devices acquired by Brits aged 55 plus were smartphones, according to the consultant’s comScore. For aficionados of the Samsung v Apple battle, interest has just ramped up with the Samsung flagship handset, the Galaxy S4, which hit the shops over the weekend. Except, those cunning PR sorts at Samsung were busy dampening expectations – or trying to create a false sense of excitement depending on your point of view - by warning of possible S4 shortages.

Demand for the S4 will be so fierce, according to vested interests by the names of Carphonewarehouse and Phones4U that they may not be able to keep up with demand. The cool and sensible response to the media frenzy resulting from the release of the S4 is to rise above it; better still, ignore it.

Better to stick to one’s existing, trusty and reliable handset. On the other hand: the writer’s existing handset, a Samsung S3, is already fully 12 months old. It has perhaps, just perhaps, been slowing down just a tad.

It is after all, an essential tool for work these days. There is also not the slightest danger of anyone – even close friends or family – accusing the writer of being cool, about anything. It is even a rare luxury to answer to the charge of being sensible. After an appropriate period – there is no point hurrying or appearing to be a tech anorak so we are talking a few days at least – the S3 can be replaced by a S4. Vague efforts will be made, with little success, to exclude from regular vocabulary words such as flagship, thinner, lighter, faster processor, best Android ever, eye recognition and smart screen.

Photograph: Getty Images

Douglas Blakey is the editor of Retail Banker International

Ukip's Nigel Farage and Paul Nuttall. Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

Is the general election 2017 the end of Ukip?

Ukip led the way to Brexit, but now the party is on less than 10 per cent in the polls. 

Ukip could be finished. Ukip has only ever had two MPs, but it held an outside influence on politics: without it, we’d probably never have had the EU referendum. But Brexit has turned Ukip into a single-issue party without an issue. Ukip’s sole remaining MP, Douglas Carswell, left the party in March 2017, and told Sky News’ Adam Boulton that there was “no point” to the party anymore. 

Not everyone in Ukip has given up, though: Nigel Farage told Peston on Sunday that Ukip “will survive”, and current leader Paul Nuttall will be contesting a seat this year. But Ukip is standing in fewer constituencies than last time thanks to a shortage of both money and people. Who benefits if Ukip is finished? It’s likely to be the Tories. 

Is Ukip finished? 

What are Ukip's poll ratings?

Ukip’s poll ratings peaked in June 2016 at 16 per cent. Since the leave campaign’s success, that has steadily declined so that Ukip is going into the 2017 general election on 4 per cent, according to the latest polls. If the polls can be trusted, that’s a serious collapse.

Can Ukip get anymore MPs?

In the 2015 general election Ukip contested nearly every seat and got 13 per cent of the vote, making it the third biggest party (although is only returned one MP). Now Ukip is reportedly struggling to find candidates and could stand in as few as 100 seats. Ukip leader Paul Nuttall will stand in Boston and Skegness, but both ex-leader Nigel Farage and donor Arron Banks have ruled themselves out of running this time.

How many members does Ukip have?

Ukip’s membership declined from 45,994 at the 2015 general election to 39,000 in 2016. That’s a worrying sign for any political party, which relies on grassroots memberships to put in the campaigning legwork.

What does Ukip's decline mean for Labour and the Conservatives? 

The rise of Ukip took votes from both the Conservatives and Labour, with a nationalist message that appealed to disaffected voters from both right and left. But the decline of Ukip only seems to be helping the Conservatives. Stephen Bush has written about how in Wales voting Ukip seems to have been a gateway drug for traditional Labour voters who are now backing the mainstream right; so the voters Ukip took from the Conservatives are reverting to the Conservatives, and the ones they took from Labour are transferring to the Conservatives too.

Ukip might be finished as an electoral force, but its influence on the rest of British politics will be felt for many years yet. 

0800 7318496