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Top stories from around the web.

Santander chief quits (FT)

The chief executive of Banco Santander has resigned ahead of a decision by Spain’s financial regulator over whether a criminal conviction should see him banned from banking.

Alfredo Sáenz, 70, who alongside Santander executive chairman Emilio Botín is credited as the architect of the bank’s transformation from domestic lender to the eurozone’s biggest lender by value, will step down immediately to be replaced by Javier Marin, a 46-year-old director of its private bank and insurance arm.

S&P sees deepening house slump in Spain, France and Holland (Telegraph)

Spanish house prices are to fall a further 13pc by the end of next year as the authorities flood the market with a backlog of repossessed properties, Standard and Poor’s has warned

Leak at BP platform could have caused "major accident" (Reuters)

Oil major BP must review the way it handles risk and maintenance at its offshore oil platforms in Norway following a leak at a North Sea platform that could have caused a major accident, Norway's oil safety watchdog said on Monday.

Sina sells Weibo stake to Alibaba for $586m (FT)

China’s most popular social network has been valued at more than $3bn after Sina Corp sold an 18 per cent stake in its microblogging service Weibo to ecommerce group Alibaba for $586m.

Nasdaq-listed Sina said it had also given Alibaba the option to raise its ownership in Weibo to 30 per cent “at a mutually agreed valuation within a certain period of time”.

O2 and BT make new links with 4G deal (Telegraph)

O2 will pay BT hundreds of millions of pounds to bolster its network to meet a sharp rise in demand for mobile internet access that is expected to result from the introduction of 4G.

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PMQs review: Theresa May shows again that Brexit means hard Brexit

The Prime Minister's promise of "an end to free movement" is incompatible with single market membership. 

Theresa May, it is commonly said, has told us nothing about Brexit. At today's PMQs, Jeremy Corbyn ran with this line, demanding that May offer "some clarity". In response, as she has before, May stated what has become her defining aim: "an end to free movement". This vow makes a "hard Brexit" (or "chaotic Brexit" as Corbyn called it) all but inevitable. The EU regards the "four freedoms" (goods, capital, services and people) as indivisible and will not grant the UK an exemption. The risk of empowering eurosceptics elsewhere is too great. Only at the cost of leaving the single market will the UK regain control of immigration.

May sought to open up a dividing line by declaring that "the Labour Party wants to continue with free movement" (it has refused to rule out its continuation). "I want to deliver on the will of the British people, he is trying to frustrate the British people," she said. The problem is determining what the people's will is. Though polls show voters want control of free movement, they also show they want to maintain single market membership. It is not only Boris Johnson who is pro-having cake and pro-eating it. 

Corbyn later revealed that he had been "consulting the great philosophers" as to the meaning of Brexit (a possible explanation for the non-mention of Heathrow, Zac Goldsmith's resignation and May's Goldman Sachs speech). "All I can come up with is Baldrick, who says our cunning plan is to have no plan," he quipped. Without missing a beat, May replied: "I'm interested that [he] chose Baldrick, of course the actor playing Baldrick was a member of the Labour Party, as I recall." (Tony Robinson, a Corbyn critic ("crap leader"), later tweeted that he still is one). "We're going to deliver the best possible deal in goods and services and we're going to deliver an end to free movement," May continued. The problem for her is that the latter aim means that the "best possible deal" may be a long way from the best. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.