Evening wrap up: today's late breaking business stories

Top stories from around the web.

Santander chief quits (FT)

The chief executive of Banco Santander has resigned ahead of a decision by Spain’s financial regulator over whether a criminal conviction should see him banned from banking.

Alfredo Sáenz, 70, who alongside Santander executive chairman Emilio Botín is credited as the architect of the bank’s transformation from domestic lender to the eurozone’s biggest lender by value, will step down immediately to be replaced by Javier Marin, a 46-year-old director of its private bank and insurance arm.

S&P sees deepening house slump in Spain, France and Holland (Telegraph)

Spanish house prices are to fall a further 13pc by the end of next year as the authorities flood the market with a backlog of repossessed properties, Standard and Poor’s has warned

Leak at BP platform could have caused "major accident" (Reuters)

Oil major BP must review the way it handles risk and maintenance at its offshore oil platforms in Norway following a leak at a North Sea platform that could have caused a major accident, Norway's oil safety watchdog said on Monday.

Sina sells Weibo stake to Alibaba for $586m (FT)

China’s most popular social network has been valued at more than $3bn after Sina Corp sold an 18 per cent stake in its microblogging service Weibo to ecommerce group Alibaba for $586m.

Nasdaq-listed Sina said it had also given Alibaba the option to raise its ownership in Weibo to 30 per cent “at a mutually agreed valuation within a certain period of time”.

O2 and BT make new links with 4G deal (Telegraph)

O2 will pay BT hundreds of millions of pounds to bolster its network to meet a sharp rise in demand for mobile internet access that is expected to result from the introduction of 4G.

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Why relations between Theresa May and Philip Hammond became tense so quickly

The political imperative of controlling immigration is clashing with the economic imperative of maintaining growth. 

There is no relationship in government more important than that between the prime minister and the chancellor. When Theresa May entered No.10, she chose Philip Hammond, a dependable technocrat and long-standing ally who she had known since Oxford University. 

But relations between the pair have proved far tenser than anticipated. On Wednesday, Hammond suggested that students could be excluded from the net migration target. "We are having conversations within government about the most appropriate way to record and address net migration," he told the Treasury select committee. The Chancellor, in common with many others, has long regarded the inclusion of students as an obstacle to growth. 

The following day Hammond was publicly rebuked by No.10. "Our position on who is included in the figures has not changed, and we are categorically not reviewing whether or not students are included," a spokesman said (as I reported in advance, May believes that the public would see this move as "a fix"). 

This is not the only clash in May's first 100 days. Hammond was aggrieved by the Prime Minister's criticisms of loose monetary policy (which forced No.10 to state that it "respects the independence of the Bank of England") and is resisting tougher controls on foreign takeovers. The Chancellor has also struck a more sceptical tone on the UK's economic prospects. "It is clear to me that the British people did not vote on June 23 to become poorer," he declared in his conference speech, a signal that national prosperity must come before control of immigration. 

May and Hammond's relationship was never going to match the remarkable bond between David Cameron and George Osborne. But should relations worsen it risks becoming closer to that beween Gordon Brown and Alistair Darling. Like Hammond, Darling entered the Treasury as a calm technocrat and an ally of the PM. But the extraordinary circumstances of the financial crisis transformed him into a far more assertive figure.

In times of turmoil, there is an inevitable clash between political and economic priorities. As prime minister, Brown resisted talk of cuts for fear of the electoral consequences. But as chancellor, Darling was more concerned with the bottom line (backing a rise in VAT). By analogy, May is focused on the political imperative of controlling immigration, while Hammond is focused on the economic imperative of maintaining growth. If their relationship is to endure far tougher times they will soon need to find a middle way. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.