Evening wrap up: today's late breaking business stories

Top stories from around the web.

Santander chief quits (FT)

The chief executive of Banco Santander has resigned ahead of a decision by Spain’s financial regulator over whether a criminal conviction should see him banned from banking.

Alfredo Sáenz, 70, who alongside Santander executive chairman Emilio Botín is credited as the architect of the bank’s transformation from domestic lender to the eurozone’s biggest lender by value, will step down immediately to be replaced by Javier Marin, a 46-year-old director of its private bank and insurance arm.

S&P sees deepening house slump in Spain, France and Holland (Telegraph)

Spanish house prices are to fall a further 13pc by the end of next year as the authorities flood the market with a backlog of repossessed properties, Standard and Poor’s has warned

Leak at BP platform could have caused "major accident" (Reuters)

Oil major BP must review the way it handles risk and maintenance at its offshore oil platforms in Norway following a leak at a North Sea platform that could have caused a major accident, Norway's oil safety watchdog said on Monday.

Sina sells Weibo stake to Alibaba for $586m (FT)

China’s most popular social network has been valued at more than $3bn after Sina Corp sold an 18 per cent stake in its microblogging service Weibo to ecommerce group Alibaba for $586m.

Nasdaq-listed Sina said it had also given Alibaba the option to raise its ownership in Weibo to 30 per cent “at a mutually agreed valuation within a certain period of time”.

O2 and BT make new links with 4G deal (Telegraph)

O2 will pay BT hundreds of millions of pounds to bolster its network to meet a sharp rise in demand for mobile internet access that is expected to result from the introduction of 4G.

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Who will win in Manchester Gorton?

Will Labour lose in Manchester Gorton?

The death of Gerald Kaufman will trigger a by-election in his Manchester Gorton seat, which has been Labour-held since 1935.

Coming so soon after the disappointing results in Copeland – where the seat was lost to the Tories – and Stoke – where the party lost vote share – some overly excitable commentators are talking up the possibility of an upset in the Manchester seat.

But Gorton is very different to Stoke-on-Trent and to Copeland. The Labour lead is 56 points, compared to 16.5 points in Stoke-on-Trent and 6.5 points in Copeland. (As I’ve written before and will doubtless write again, it’s much more instructive to talk about vote share rather than vote numbers in British elections. Most of the country tends to vote in the same way even if they vote at different volumes.)

That 47 per cent of the seat's residents come from a non-white background and that the Labour party holds every council seat in the constituency only adds to the party's strong position here. 

But that doesn’t mean that there is no interest to be had in the contest at all. That the seat voted heavily to remain in the European Union – around 65 per cent according to Chris Hanretty’s estimates – will provide a glimmer of hope to the Liberal Democrats that they can finish a strong second, as they did consistently from 1992 to 2010, before slumping to fifth in 2015.

How they do in second place will inform how jittery Labour MPs with smaller majorities and a history of Liberal Democrat activity are about Labour’s embrace of Brexit.

They also have a narrow chance of becoming competitive should Labour’s selection turn acrimonious. The seat has been in special measures since 2004, which means the selection will be run by the party’s national executive committee, though several local candidates are tipped to run, with Afzal Khan,  a local MEP, and Julie Reid, a local councillor, both expected to run for the vacant seats.

It’s highly unlikely but if the selection occurs in a way that irritates the local party or provokes serious local in-fighting, you can just about see how the Liberal Democrats give everyone a surprise. But it’s about as likely as the United States men landing on Mars any time soon – plausible, but far-fetched. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.