Companies ease out of financial distress

34 per cent decline in "critical" difficulties.

Fewer companies are facing severe financial distress than they were a year ago, in a sign that the economic climate might be improving in the UK

According to the Begbies Traynor Red Flag Alert for Q1, there has a been a 34 per cent decline in companies rated as having “critical” financial difficulties. Across all sectors, the number of companies reduced from 5,000 in the first quarter of last year, to 3283 in Q1 2013.

However, Begbies Traynor warned that the improvement “masks a patchy recovery” and said that sectors reliant on the consumer economy such as retail, leisure, media and real estate had seen an increase in financial distress for the period.

Plus, taken on a quarterly basis, there has been an 8 per cent increase in critical companies from the last quarter of 2012.

The number of leisure companies facing severe financial distress has rocketed by 81 per cent since last quarter, which the report says may be due to unseasonably cold weather in the start of the year. The number of construction companies in critical conditions almost halved compared on last year’s numbers, whereas the real estate sector hs seen fincnail ditress levels rise 24 per cent in the last year.

Julie Palmer, partner at Begbies Traynor, said, “The year on year improvement reflects the continued forbearance and benign monetary conditions facing UK businesses today, combined with an improving credit environment, albeit primarily for larger corporates. Business confidence is slowly returning in the form of greater business spending on both services and investment.”

The report also sounds concern over the lack of funding available to support the SME sector. The number of companies that managed to secure new funding had dropped by 14.5 per cent from a year ago, and down 11 per cent on a quarterly basis.

Palmer added: “The underlying trend is arguably one of an improving picture. However, given the slight increase in distress compared to the previous quarter, it remains to be seen if we are out of the woods yet. With business rate increases planned in April, HMRC’s new PAYE Real Time Information requirements coming into effect, and further minimum wage rises ahead there are still significant headwinds for the UK SME sector, which is typically less able to bear the burden of these changes than their larger counterparts.”

The support services and professional services sectors have seen the strongest recovery in the last year.

This story first appeared on economia

Photograph: Getty Images

This is a news story from economia.

Ukip's Nigel Farage and Paul Nuttall. Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

Is the general election 2017 the end of Ukip?

Ukip led the way to Brexit, but now the party is on less than 10 per cent in the polls. 

Ukip could be finished. Ukip has only ever had two MPs, but it held an outside influence on politics: without it, we’d probably never have had the EU referendum. But Brexit has turned Ukip into a single-issue party without an issue. Ukip’s sole remaining MP, Douglas Carswell, left the party in March 2017, and told Sky News’ Adam Boulton that there was “no point” to the party anymore. 

Not everyone in Ukip has given up, though: Nigel Farage told Peston on Sunday that Ukip “will survive”, and current leader Paul Nuttall will be contesting a seat this year. But Ukip is standing in fewer constituencies than last time thanks to a shortage of both money and people. Who benefits if Ukip is finished? It’s likely to be the Tories. 

Is Ukip finished? 

What are Ukip's poll ratings?

Ukip’s poll ratings peaked in June 2016 at 16 per cent. Since the leave campaign’s success, that has steadily declined so that Ukip is going into the 2017 general election on 4 per cent, according to the latest polls. If the polls can be trusted, that’s a serious collapse.

Can Ukip get anymore MPs?

In the 2015 general election Ukip contested nearly every seat and got 13 per cent of the vote, making it the third biggest party (although is only returned one MP). Now Ukip is reportedly struggling to find candidates and could stand in as few as 100 seats. Ukip leader Paul Nuttall will stand in Boston and Skegness, but both ex-leader Nigel Farage and donor Arron Banks have ruled themselves out of running this time.

How many members does Ukip have?

Ukip’s membership declined from 45,994 at the 2015 general election to 39,000 in 2016. That’s a worrying sign for any political party, which relies on grassroots memberships to put in the campaigning legwork.

What does Ukip's decline mean for Labour and the Conservatives? 

The rise of Ukip took votes from both the Conservatives and Labour, with a nationalist message that appealed to disaffected voters from both right and left. But the decline of Ukip only seems to be helping the Conservatives. Stephen Bush has written about how in Wales voting Ukip seems to have been a gateway drug for traditional Labour voters who are now backing the mainstream right; so the voters Ukip took from the Conservatives are reverting to the Conservatives, and the ones they took from Labour are transferring to the Conservatives too.

Ukip might be finished as an electoral force, but its influence on the rest of British politics will be felt for many years yet. 

0800 7318496