The switch to digital: a headf*ck for the car industry

Radios come attached.

The issue of the great switchover to digital radio is a tricky one to solve for the car industry.

At home, simply buying a new DAB radio, listening through the internet or even through your TV will solve the problem when the analogue signal is switched off, but all of these are a bit more tricky in the car, which is where plenty of the radio listening audience resides.

So it will be a while yet before a timescale is even set out for the turn-off, but it's another factor that should be taken into consideration when speccing new vehicles, as you can guarantee that the issue will be a whole lot higher up the consciousness of used buyers three or four years from now than it is at the moment.

And rather than boosting the used values for vehicles fitted with radios, it seems likely that those without will find their values dropping.

At present, only BMW, Mini and Jaguar offer a digital radio as standard with every model they sell in the UK, with BMW only as of January and having put the price of the cars up to cover the additional kit. Land Rover is also there with the exception of the entry Range Rover Sport, according to the comprehensive data provided to us by Kwik Carcost, and there are a few isolated commendable standard fitments across the range, such as the new Vauxhall Adam and the Zafira Tourer, as well as various Mercedes and VW models, while Ford is also at the forefront of offering the technology.

But worryingly, at this stage nearly a dozen of the biggest business car brands in the UK don't even offer a digital radio as an option on any model in their range. The car industry has some changing to do. And fast.
 

This article first appeared on BusinessCar.

Photograph: Getty Images

Paul Barker is group automotive editor at BusinessCar.co.uk.

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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.