Ok, so there is "tokenism" in selecting women, say firms

"Still on the nursery slopes"

Leading figures from major law and accountancy firms admit there has been "some tokenism” over the issue of women in senior roles

Simon Collins, chair of KPMG UK, said there has to be organic change to address the problem but “we are still on the nursery slopes”.

Collins was speaking at the Women in Professional Firms: The Male Perspective event hosted by SJ Berwin and Steven Pearce Associates (SPA) last week.

It was the launch of SPA’s latest research report, based on interviews with senior-level men from leading professional firms on why there are so few women at the top of professional firms and what both genders can do, strategically and practically, to obtain a balance.

Accountancy and the legal profession have been criticised for the lack of women in partnership and leadership roles, despite a recent push to instil greater equality.

Collins said that although it is true that some are “paying lip service”, his firm is serious about the issue from the top down.

“There needs to be more organic change. The leadership and tone have to be authentic. It’s incredibly easy to undermine it so it’s vital for those in senior positions to set that tone,” he said.

Mark Bomer, senior partner at BDO LLP, said that it was a very difficult proposition. "How do you make firms more attractive to senior women?

“I admit our firm is not at the forefront but others have done some great things with little results,” he added.

Christopher Saul, senior partner at Slaughter & May, argued that, equality aside, from a business standpoint it represented a poor return on investment of time and money when almost half of his firm's women leave before gaining a senior position.

He admitted that there has been some “tokenism” and that there has to be more tangible action on the issue.

This article can be read in full at economia.

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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.