Japan's next central banker promises "whatever it takes" to fight deflation

Kuroda pulls a Draghi.

Japan is where all the action in monetary policy is taking place, and the news this weekend is no exception. Haruhiko Kuroda, the man who is likely to become the new governor of the Bank of Japan following his nomination by prime minister Shinzo Abe, has apparently been taking lessons from Mario Draghi.

Bloomberg's Michael McDonough tells the story:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The crucial phrase there is "whatever it takes". That's the phrase which has gone down in history as the turning point in the euro crisis. Last July, Mario Draghi promised to do "whatever it takes" to preserve the euro — and from that moment, Italian bond yields fell almost consistently until mid-February when traders realised how shambolic the election was gearing up to be. This chart from Business Insider shows just how strong the effect was:

 

Kuroda will be hoping he can have half the effect of Draghi. But since the effectiveness of promising to do whatever it takes is dependent on everyone believing that you actually will, Japan has an advantage in this game. The lengths the government has gone to to tackle deflation already far exceed anything any other country has attempted, and it would appear they are only getting started.

Haruhiko Kuroda. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Could Jeremy Corbyn still be excluded from the leadership race? The High Court will rule today

Labour donor Michael Foster has applied for a judgement. 

If you thought Labour's National Executive Committee's decision to let Jeremy Corbyn automatically run again for leader was the end of it, think again. 

Today, the High Court will decide whether the NEC made the right judgement - or if Corbyn should have been forced to seek nominations from 51 MPs, which would effectively block him from the ballot.

The legal challenge is brought by Michael Foster, a Labour donor and former parliamentary candidate. Corbyn is listed as one of the defendants.

Before the NEC decision, both Corbyn's team and the rebel MPs sought legal advice.

Foster has maintained he is simply seeking the views of experts. 

Nevertheless, he has clashed with Corbyn before. He heckled the Labour leader, whose party has been racked with anti-Semitism scandals, at a Labour Friends of Israel event in September 2015, where he demanded: "Say the word Israel."

But should the judge decide in favour of Foster, would the Labour leadership challenge really be over?

Dr Peter Catterall, a reader in history at Westminster University and a specialist in opposition studies, doesn't think so. He said: "The Labour party is a private institution, so unless they are actually breaking the law, it seems to me it is about how you interpret the rules of the party."

Corbyn's bid to be personally mentioned on the ballot paper was a smart move, he said, and the High Court's decision is unlikely to heal wounds.

 "You have to ask yourself, what is the point of doing this? What does success look like?" he said. "Will it simply reinforce the idea that Mr Corbyn is being made a martyr by people who are out to get him?"