"It must realise its current business model is dead"

Merkel on Cyprus.

Merkel summed up the situation earlier this morning in Cyprus, via Reuters.

She's right - when Cyprus gave in to political pressure and decided to ditch the levy on small savers, it also said goodbye to its economic structure. If it had taxed under $100,000 depositors, it may have been able to maintain its weird, top-heavy banking sector fuelled by Russian oligarchs. It's too late now though. Cyprus's solutions are falling away fast - today's news was that Russia is really, really unlikely to come to Cyprus's aid.

Cyprus's banking system is odd though. At times it has done well - back before the financial crisis, Cyprus was described by the International Monetary Fund as going through a "long period of high growth, low unemployment, and sound public finances" - but it this wasn't sustainable. Here's the Telegraph's Rachel Cooper on what happened next:

By 2011, the IMF reported that the assets of Cypriot banks were equivalent to 835pc of annual national income. Some of that was down to investment by foreign-owned banks, but most was Cypriot.

This imbalance might have been sustainable had the country’s two largest banks not made loans to the Greek government worth 160pc of Cypriot GDP.

When the value of the debts owed by the Greek state was cut by 75pc, the Cypriot banks were hit hard. Cyprus became stuck in a familiar negative cycle: already weak government finances were further ravaged by slow economic growth and the turmoil in the eurozone.

It will be painful, but in the long run the dismantling of Cyprus's financial foundations may be no bad thing.

Angela Merkel. Photograph: Getty Images
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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.