Five questions answered on Lloyd Bank’s large pre-tax losses

£570m loss for 2012.

Lloyd Banking Group today posted huge pre-tax losses for 2012. We answer five questions on Lloyd’s current losses.

What’s the amount of Lloyd’s pre-tax losses?

The 39 per cent state owned group is reporting a £570m loss for 2012.

Why so much?

The bank set aside a £1.8bn rise in mis-selling provisions last year, which has dented its profit margins. Last week, it was also fined £4.3m for delaying compensation payments to customers over PPI mis-selling.

However, take away the money set aside for the mis-selling claims - £1.5bn for payment protection insurance and £310m for interest rate swaps – the lender said underlying pre-tax profit jumped from £638m to £2.6bn.

The consumer association Which? estimate that the bank’s latest update took the total amount set aside for PPI by the industry to £15bn.
Will Lloyd’s bankers still be getting their bonuses? 

Most likely. The bank has set aside £365m to pay staff bonuses and would hand its chief executive, Antonio Horta-Osorio, a deferred share award worth £1.49m.

"I came here with the main objective of getting taxpayers' money back and, therefore, I thought it would be appropriate to make my bonus entirely conditional to us getting to the taxpayer entry price," Lloyd’s Chief Executive Mr Horta-Osorio told journalists.

What else has he said in regards to this pre-tax loss?

In Lloyds’s annual report statement he said:

"Since setting out our strategy in June 2011, we have significantly strengthened the balance sheet and substantially improved efficiency and focus, while continuing to work through legacy issues.

"We are investing in our simple, lower-risk, customer-focused UK retail and commercial banking model, and in value-for-money products and better capabilities to continue to support UK households, businesses and communities."

What have the experts said?

The figures provided good news for the government former investment banker Heather McGregor told the BBC . "We hear that the government is looking to exit sooner rather than later, and if I was the government I would be doing that. I'd be looking at these figures going 'yes, I can get my money back much quicker'," she said.

Lloyd Banking Group today posted huge pre-tax losses for 2012. Photograh: Getty Images

Heidi Vella is a features writer for

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Why relations between Theresa May and Philip Hammond became tense so quickly

The political imperative of controlling immigration is clashing with the economic imperative of maintaining growth. 

There is no relationship in government more important than that between the prime minister and the chancellor. When Theresa May entered No.10, she chose Philip Hammond, a dependable technocrat and long-standing ally who she had known since Oxford University. 

But relations between the pair have proved far tenser than anticipated. On Wednesday, Hammond suggested that students could be excluded from the net migration target. "We are having conversations within government about the most appropriate way to record and address net migration," he told the Treasury select committee. The Chancellor, in common with many others, has long regarded the inclusion of students as an obstacle to growth. 

The following day Hammond was publicly rebuked by No.10. "Our position on who is included in the figures has not changed, and we are categorically not reviewing whether or not students are included," a spokesman said (as I reported in advance, May believes that the public would see this move as "a fix"). 

This is not the only clash in May's first 100 days. Hammond was aggrieved by the Prime Minister's criticisms of loose monetary policy (which forced No.10 to state that it "respects the independence of the Bank of England") and is resisting tougher controls on foreign takeovers. The Chancellor has also struck a more sceptical tone on the UK's economic prospects. "It is clear to me that the British people did not vote on June 23 to become poorer," he declared in his conference speech, a signal that national prosperity must come before control of immigration. 

May and Hammond's relationship was never going to match the remarkable bond between David Cameron and George Osborne. But should relations worsen it risks becoming closer to that beween Gordon Brown and Alistair Darling. Like Hammond, Darling entered the Treasury as a calm technocrat and an ally of the PM. But the extraordinary circumstances of the financial crisis transformed him into a far more assertive figure.

In times of turmoil, there is an inevitable clash between political and economic priorities. As prime minister, Brown resisted talk of cuts for fear of the electoral consequences. But as chancellor, Darling was more concerned with the bottom line (backing a rise in VAT). By analogy, May is focused on the political imperative of controlling immigration, while Hammond is focused on the economic imperative of maintaining growth. If their relationship is to endure far tougher times they will soon need to find a middle way. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.