Five questions answered on further job losses at AstraZeneca

UK pharma firm cuts a further 2,300 jobs globally.

UK pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca has announced further job losses on top of the ones it announced at the beginning of the week. We answer five questions on the AstraZeneca job losses.

How many job losses has AstraZeneca announced this week?

On Monday the company announced around 2,300 job losses world wide - around 700 from the UK. Today it has announced a further 2,300 jobs will be lost globally.

Why is the company axing these jobs?

AstraZeneca is in the process of restructuring its business and has outlined a new strategy that has resulted in these job losses. One of the big aspects of its UK restructuring is closing down its London office and opening a new headquarters in Cambridge.

Research and development work will no longer be carried out at its Alderley Park, Cheshire facility, with approximately 1,600 roles being relocated to Cambridge.

How much is the company investing in Cambridge?

The company is investing £330m ($500m) to build a new headquarters in Cambridge and creating 2,000 jobs in the area.

What other problems do AstraZeneca face?

The company is struggling with a lack of drug developments in the pipeline and patents of blockbuster drugs that are due to expire.

Today it announced it will concentrate on developing drugs to combat respiratory, inflammation and autoimmunity, heart disease and cancer treatments.

What has AstraZeneca said in regards to its new strategy?

In a press statement Chief Executive Officer, Pascal Soriot said: “We are making an unambiguous commitment to concentrate our efforts and resources on our priority growth platforms and our priority pipeline projects.

“As we focus, accelerate and transform our business we know that our success will ultimately be measured by the quality of execution. I’m confident that we have set out on the right path to return to growth and achieve scientific leadership, and I’m equally confident that our people possess the talent, determination and focus to deliver for patients as well as our shareholders.”

Photograph: Getty Images

Heidi Vella is a features writer for Nridigital.com

Getty
Show Hide image

John McDonnell accuses Labour of “rigged purge” of Corbyn supporters

The shadow chancellor criticises the party's national executive committee for its expulsion of members and supporters from the leadership election.

John McDonnell has accused Labour of targeting Jeremy Corbyn's supporters in a "purge" of those allowed to vote in the leadership election.

"Labour party members will not accept what appears to be a rigged purge of Jeremy Corbyn supporters", the shadow chancellor wrote. "The conduct of this election must be fair and even-handed."

McDonnell, who is Corbyn's campaign manager, added: "I am writing to Labour's general secretary Iain McNicol to demand that members and supporters who are suspended or lose their voting rights are given clear information about why action has been taken and a timely opportunity to challenge the decision. In particular, the specification of particular terms of abuse to exclude Labour party members from voting should not be applied retrospectively."

The statement follows the suspension of Bakers' Union boss Ronnie Draper from voting in the election, an action Draper attributed to unspecified previous social media posts. Labour's national executive committee has not commented on the reasons for his suspension.

"While Ronnie, a supporter of Jeremy Corbyn, has been denied his say in Labour's elecion, no action is being taken over the Labour peer, Lord Sainsbury, who has given more than £2m to support the Liberal Democrats," McDonnell said. "And no action has been taken against Michael Foster, the Labour party member who abused Jeremy Corbyn's supporters and staff as Nazi stormtroopers in the Daily Mail."

McDonnell's statement adds to an already febrile mood over the election, which sees Corbyn pitted against challenger Owen Smith. A week ago, a group of Labour grandees signed a letter condemning "intolerable" attacks on party staff - who are not allowed to respond to allegations made against them. The latest statement will be seen as a warning shot to general secretary Iain McNicol, who the leadership feel has consistently interpreted the party's rules to Corbyn's disadvantage. 

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.