Five questions answered on Centrica’s £10bn gas deal

Deal to safeguard UK energy.

British Gas owner, Centrica, has today announced that it has stuck a deal with America to secure future gas for the UK. We answer five questions on the deal.

What are the details of the deal?

The company have struck a ten year deal with American Cheniere Energy Partners for £10bn to  supply 91,250,000 mmbtu (89 billion cubic feet) of annual liquefied natural gas (LNG), ensuring UK gas supply in the near future.

How many homes do Centrica expect to supply via this gas deal?

As many as 1.8 million homes.

What else has Centrica said about the deal?

Sam Laidlaw, Chief Executive of Centrica, said in a press statement: “In an increasingly global gas market, this landmark agreement represents a significant step forward in our strategy, enabling Centrica to strengthen its position along the gas value chain and helping to ensure the UK’s future energy security.”

In the same statement the Prime Minister David Cameron also said: “I warmly welcome this commercial agreement between Centrica and Cheniere.  Future gas supplies from the US will help diversify our energy mix and provide British consumers with a new long-term, secure and affordable source of fuel."

Will the deal help the recent gas shortage caused by the ongoing cold weather?

No, as the Louisiana-based plant will not begin its first shipments to the UK until 2018.

UK demand is currently running 32 per cent above normal seasonal demand.

However, a shipment from Qatar is to dock in Milford Haven today, to ease pressure on supply.

What has the government said about this recent strain on the UK gas supply?

Energy minister John Hayes yesterday said there was no gas shortage crisis, speaking to the Telegraph he said: “We get our supplies from a diverse range of sources and the market is proving to be highly responsive to the UK’s needs,”

Photograph: Getty Images

Heidi Vella is a features writer for Nridigital.com

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The Brexit slowdown is real

As Europe surges ahead, the UK is enduring its worst economic growth for five years. 

The recession that the Treasury and others forecast would follow the EU referendum never came. But there is now unmistakable evidence of an economic slowdown. 

Growth in the second quarter of this year was 0.3 per cent, which, following quarter one's 0.2 per cent, makes this the worst opening half since 2012. For individuals, growth is now almost non-existent. GDP per capita rose by just 0.1 per cent, continuing the worst living standards recovery on record. 

That Brexit helped cause the slowdown, rather than merely coincided with it, is evidenced by several facts. One is that, as George Osborne's former chief of staff Rupert Harrison observes, "the rest of Europe is booming and we're not". In the year since the EU referendum, Britain has gone from being one of the west's strongest performers to one of its weakest. 

The long-promised economic rebalancing, meanwhile, is further away than ever. Industrial production and manufacturing declined by 0.4 per cent and 0.5 per cent respectively, with only services (up 0.5 per cent) making up for the shortfall. But with real wage growth negative (falling by 0.7 per cent in the three months to May 2017), and household saving at a record low, there is limited potential for consumers to continue to power growth. The pound's sharp depreciation since the Brexit vote has cut wages (by increasing inflation) without producing a corresponding rise in exports. 

To the UK's existing defects – low productivity, low investment and low pay – new ones have been added: political uncertainty and economic instability. As the clock runs down on its departure date, Britain is drifting towards Brexit in ever-worse shape. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.