Five questions answered on Centrica’s £10bn gas deal

Deal to safeguard UK energy.

British Gas owner, Centrica, has today announced that it has stuck a deal with America to secure future gas for the UK. We answer five questions on the deal.

What are the details of the deal?

The company have struck a ten year deal with American Cheniere Energy Partners for £10bn to  supply 91,250,000 mmbtu (89 billion cubic feet) of annual liquefied natural gas (LNG), ensuring UK gas supply in the near future.

How many homes do Centrica expect to supply via this gas deal?

As many as 1.8 million homes.

What else has Centrica said about the deal?

Sam Laidlaw, Chief Executive of Centrica, said in a press statement: “In an increasingly global gas market, this landmark agreement represents a significant step forward in our strategy, enabling Centrica to strengthen its position along the gas value chain and helping to ensure the UK’s future energy security.”

In the same statement the Prime Minister David Cameron also said: “I warmly welcome this commercial agreement between Centrica and Cheniere.  Future gas supplies from the US will help diversify our energy mix and provide British consumers with a new long-term, secure and affordable source of fuel."

Will the deal help the recent gas shortage caused by the ongoing cold weather?

No, as the Louisiana-based plant will not begin its first shipments to the UK until 2018.

UK demand is currently running 32 per cent above normal seasonal demand.

However, a shipment from Qatar is to dock in Milford Haven today, to ease pressure on supply.

What has the government said about this recent strain on the UK gas supply?

Energy minister John Hayes yesterday said there was no gas shortage crisis, speaking to the Telegraph he said: “We get our supplies from a diverse range of sources and the market is proving to be highly responsive to the UK’s needs,”

Photograph: Getty Images

Heidi Vella is a features writer for

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Jeremy Corbyn challenged by Labour MPs to sack Ken Livingstone from defence review

Former mayor of London criticised at PLP meeting over comments on 7 July bombings. 

After Jeremy Corbyn's decision to give Labour MPs a free vote over air strikes in Syria, tonight's Parliamentary Labour Party (PLP) meeting was less fractious than it could have been. But one grandee was still moved to declare that the "ferocity" of the attacks on the leader made it the most "uplifting" he had attended.

Margaret Beckett, the former foreign secretary, told the meeting: "We cannot unite the party if the leader's office is determined to divide us." Several MPs said afterwards that many of those who shared Corbyn's opposition to air strikes believed he had mishandled the process by appealing to MPs over the heads of the shadow cabinet and then to members. David Winnick declared that those who favoured military action faced a "shakedown" and deselection by Momentum activists. "It is completely unacceptable. They are a party within a party," he said of the Corbyn-aligned group. The "huge applause" for Hilary Benn, who favours intervention, far outweighed that for the leader, I'm told. 

There was also loud agreement when Jack Dromey condemned Ken Livingstone for blaming Tony Blair's invasion of Iraq for the 7 July 2005 bombings. Along with Angela Smith MP, Dromey demanded that Livingstone be sacked as the co-chair of Labour's defence review. Significantly, Benn said aftewards that he agreed with every word Dromey had said. Corbyn's office has previously said that it is up to the NEC, not the leader, whether the former London mayor holds the position. In reference to 7 July, an aide repeated Corbyn's statement that he preferred to "remember the brilliant words Ken used after 7/7". 

As on previous occasions, MPs complained that the leader failed to answer the questions that were put to him. A shadow minister told me that he "dodged" one on whether he believed the UK should end air strikes against Isis in Iraq. In reference to Syria, a Corbyn aide said afterwards that "There was significant support for the leader. There was a wide debate, with people speaking on both sides of the arguments." After David Cameron's decision to call a vote on air strikes for Wednesday, leaving only a day for debate, the number of Labour MPs backing intervention is likely to fall. One shadow minister told me that as few as 40-50 may back the government, though most expect the total to be closer to the original figure of 99. 

At the end of another remarkable day in Labour's history, a Corbyn aide concluded: "It was always going to be a bumpy ride when you have a leader who was elected by a large number outside parliament but whose support in the PLP is quite limited. There are a small number who find it hard to come to terms with that result."

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.