Five questions answered on Centrica’s £10bn gas deal

Deal to safeguard UK energy.

British Gas owner, Centrica, has today announced that it has stuck a deal with America to secure future gas for the UK. We answer five questions on the deal.

What are the details of the deal?

The company have struck a ten year deal with American Cheniere Energy Partners for £10bn to  supply 91,250,000 mmbtu (89 billion cubic feet) of annual liquefied natural gas (LNG), ensuring UK gas supply in the near future.

How many homes do Centrica expect to supply via this gas deal?

As many as 1.8 million homes.

What else has Centrica said about the deal?

Sam Laidlaw, Chief Executive of Centrica, said in a press statement: “In an increasingly global gas market, this landmark agreement represents a significant step forward in our strategy, enabling Centrica to strengthen its position along the gas value chain and helping to ensure the UK’s future energy security.”

In the same statement the Prime Minister David Cameron also said: “I warmly welcome this commercial agreement between Centrica and Cheniere.  Future gas supplies from the US will help diversify our energy mix and provide British consumers with a new long-term, secure and affordable source of fuel."

Will the deal help the recent gas shortage caused by the ongoing cold weather?

No, as the Louisiana-based plant will not begin its first shipments to the UK until 2018.

UK demand is currently running 32 per cent above normal seasonal demand.

However, a shipment from Qatar is to dock in Milford Haven today, to ease pressure on supply.

What has the government said about this recent strain on the UK gas supply?

Energy minister John Hayes yesterday said there was no gas shortage crisis, speaking to the Telegraph he said: “We get our supplies from a diverse range of sources and the market is proving to be highly responsive to the UK’s needs,”

Photograph: Getty Images

Heidi Vella is a features writer for Nridigital.com

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I believe only Yvette Cooper has the breadth of support to beat Jeremy Corbyn

All the recent polling suggests Andy Burnham is losing more votes than anyone else to Jeremy Corbyn, says Diana Johnson MP.

Tom Blenkinsop MP on the New Statesman website today says he is giving his second preference to Andy Burnham as he thinks that Andy has the best chance of beating Jeremy.

This is on the basis that if Yvette goes out first all her second preferences will swing behind Andy, whereas if Andy goes out first then his second preferences, due to the broad alliance he has created behind his campaign, will all or largely switch to the other male candidate, Jeremy.

Let's take a deep breath and try and think through what will be the effect of preferential voting in the Labour leadership.

First of all, it is very difficult to know how second preferences will switch. From my telephone canvassing there is some rather interesting voting going on, but I don't accept that Tom’s analysis is correct. I have certainly picked up growing support for Yvette in recent weeks.

In fact you can argue the reverse of Tom’s analysis is true – Andy has moved further away from the centre and, as a result, his pitch to those like Tom who are supporting Liz first is now narrower. As a result, Yvette is more likely to pick up those second preferences.

Stats from the Yvette For Labour team show Yvette picking up the majority of second preferences from all candidates – from the Progress wing supporting Liz to the softer left fans of Jeremy – and Andy's supporters too. Their figures show many undecideds opting for Yvette as their first preference, as well as others choosing to switch their first preference to Yvette from one of the other candidates. It's for this reason I still believe only Yvette has the breadth of support to beat Jeremy and then to go on to win in 2020.

It's interesting that Andy has not been willing to make it clear that second preferences should go to Yvette or Liz. Yvette has been very clear that she would encourage second preferences to be for Andy or Liz.

Having watched Andy on Sky's Murnaghan show this morning, he categorically states that Labour will not get beyond first base with the electorate at a general election if we are not economically credible and that fundamentally Jeremy's economic plans do not add up. So, I am unsure why Andy is so unwilling to be clear on second preferences.

All the recent polling suggests Andy is losing more votes than anyone else to Jeremy. He trails fourth in London – where a huge proportion of our electorate is based.

So I would urge Tom to reflect more widely on who is best placed to provide the strongest opposition to the Tories, appeal to the widest group of voters and reach out to the communities we need to win back. I believe that this has to be Yvette.

The Newsnight focus group a few days ago showed that Yvette is best placed to win back those former Labour voters we will need in 2020.

Labour will pay a massive price if we ignore this.

Diana Johnson is the Labour MP for Hull North.