In a couple of hours, we'll know how it will end for Cyprus

Deal coming.

It could still all end well... Cyprus officials have said that a deal "within the EU framework" could be hours away.

Traders are optimistic. Here's the euro's rally against the dollar:

(via Bloomberg)

...and here's Stylianides's full statement to reporters in Nicosia:

The President of the Republic and the Government are in hard negotiations with Troika in order to conclude to solutions that will save the banking system, the economy in general and will bring back calmness in the country. During these really critical hours, everyone must demonstrate the highest level of responsibility.

The President of the Republic, as he mentioned during his address to the nation, assumed a high political cost and accepted the deal with the Eurogroup for the stability levy, despite his disagreements, bearing in mind the social misery that a possible rejection of the proposal would cause.

In a few hours we will be called upon to take the big decisions and reply to the hard dilemmas.

The Government has already submitted the bills. The philosophy through which it is trying to find the best possible solution, under the given circumstances, is already known.The House of Representatives will soon be called upon to take the big decisions.Undoubtedly, there will also be painful aspects in any decision taken, but the country must be saved.

The political leadership must, despite the different ideological and political approaches,provide the way out. The President of the Republic as the guardian of unity kept the political leadership constantly briefed and respected the decision of the House of Representatives. Through the continuous meetings with the party leaders he aimed at collective wisdom.
The next few hours will determine the future of this country. We must all assume our responsibility.

Photograph: Getty Images
Grant Shapps on the campaign trail. Photo: Getty
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Grant Shapps resigns over Tory youth wing bullying scandal

The minister, formerly party chairman, has resigned over allegations of bullying and blackmail made against a Tory activist. 

Grant Shapps, who was a key figure in the Tory general election campaign, has resigned following allegations about a bullying scandal among Conservative activists.

Shapps was formerly party chairman, but was demoted to international development minister after May. His formal statement is expected shortly.

The resignation follows lurid claims about bullying and blackmail among Tory activists. One, Mark Clarke, has been accused of putting pressure on a fellow activist who complained about his behaviour to withdraw the allegation. The complainant, Elliot Johnson, later killed himself.

The junior Treasury minister Robert Halfon also revealed that he had an affair with a young activist after being warned that Clarke planned to blackmail him over the relationship. Former Tory chair Sayeedi Warsi says that she was targeted by Clarke on Twitter, where he tried to portray her as an anti-semite. 

Shapps appointed Mark Clarke to run RoadTrip 2015, where young Tory activists toured key marginals on a bus before the general election. 

Today, the Guardian published an emotional interview with the parents of 21-year-old Elliot Johnson, the activist who killed himself, in which they called for Shapps to consider his position. Ray Johnson also spoke to BBC's Newsnight:


The Johnson family claimed that Shapps and co-chair Andrew Feldman had failed to act on complaints made against Clarke. Feldman says he did not hear of the bullying claims until August. 

Asked about the case at a conference in Malta, David Cameron pointedly refused to offer Shapps his full backing, saying a statement would be released. “I think it is important that on the tragic case that took place that the coroner’s inquiry is allowed to proceed properly," he added. “I feel deeply for his parents, It is an appalling loss to suffer and that is why it is so important there is a proper coroner’s inquiry. In terms of what the Conservative party should do, there should be and there is a proper inquiry that asks all the questions as people come forward. That will take place. It is a tragic loss of a talented young life and it is not something any parent should go through and I feel for them deeply.” 

Mark Clarke denies any wrongdoing.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.