Retail sales drop year-on-year

Corrugated bottom approaches.

ONS statistics released today show that, retail sales in January 2013 have fallen in quantity by 0.6 per cent year-on-year, the first year-on-year contraction since August 2011. The three-month trend remains positive, with the most recent quarter up 0.1 per cent on the same quarter last year. The value of retail sales is also on a downward trend, with the month-on-month and quarter-on-quarter sales declining.

The ONS explains that "the timeliness of these retail sales statistics, which are published just two weeks after the end of each month, makes them an important early economic indicator", and this month, they indicate a worrying decline in consumer spending. That said, compared to last January, which saw a 1.6 per cent decline year-on-year amid snowmaggedon, the news could be much worse.

This data must be read in conjunction with the earlier PMI indicators, which suggested a contraction in construction but growth in manufacturing and services. The UK economy is hovering, as it has for a while, on the border between growth and contraction. It will be the merest of technicalities as to whether we end up with a technical triple dip recession, but either way the picture is not rosy.

Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

New Statesman
Show Hide image

Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.