Retail sales drop year-on-year

Corrugated bottom approaches.

ONS statistics released today show that, retail sales in January 2013 have fallen in quantity by 0.6 per cent year-on-year, the first year-on-year contraction since August 2011. The three-month trend remains positive, with the most recent quarter up 0.1 per cent on the same quarter last year. The value of retail sales is also on a downward trend, with the month-on-month and quarter-on-quarter sales declining.

The ONS explains that "the timeliness of these retail sales statistics, which are published just two weeks after the end of each month, makes them an important early economic indicator", and this month, they indicate a worrying decline in consumer spending. That said, compared to last January, which saw a 1.6 per cent decline year-on-year amid snowmaggedon, the news could be much worse.

This data must be read in conjunction with the earlier PMI indicators, which suggested a contraction in construction but growth in manufacturing and services. The UK economy is hovering, as it has for a while, on the border between growth and contraction. It will be the merest of technicalities as to whether we end up with a technical triple dip recession, but either way the picture is not rosy.

Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

Photo: Getty
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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.