Markets react to UK downgrade by doing basically nothing

*Yawn*.

We've said again and again and again that credit rating agencies have very little economic effect, and Friday's downgrade of Britain from Aaa to Aa1 rating is proving that to be the case yet again.

The UK government's cost of borrowing, as you can see in this chart via Sky's Ed Conway, is already back at the level it was before the downgrade — and actually lower than it was when markets opened on Friday:

 

Image: Bloomberg

The pound, meanwhile, is stable against the dollar and only slightly down against the Euro. In the context of its yearlong drop, that's a positive:

 

Image: Thompson Reuters

So long as Cameron and Osborne are prepared to ignore the message the downgrade sends — and let's be clear, despite the economically incoherent reasoning Moody's give, the message is that austerity has failed — the markets will continue to respond with a deafening "meh".

Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Word of the week: Michellania


Each week The Staggers will pick a new word to describe our uncharted political and socioeconomic territory. 

After brash Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump paraded his family at the national convention, the word of the week is:

Michellania (n)

A speech made of words and phrases gathered from different sources, such as Michelle Obama speeches and Rick Astley lyrics.

Usage: 

"I listened hard, but all I heard was michellania."

"Can you really tell the difference between all this michellania?"

"This michellania - you couldn't make it up."

Articles to read if you're sick of michellania:

Do you have a suggestion for next week's word? Share it in the form below.