UK retail sales fell - who were the biggest casualties?

Blockbuster, HMV, Jessops and more.

UK retail sales fell in December - 0.1 per cent from the month before. For a December, this is bad: at 0.3 per cent the annual growth rate is the slowest since 1998 (excepting 2010).

Only one sector has been doing well: rather unsurprisingly, online retailers are fine. About 10.6 per cent of sales were carried out online during the month, compared to 9.4 per cent in December last year.

Companies from other sectors have not been as lucky. Here are the biggest casualties from the past year:

1. Blockbuster

On 16 January the company announced it would go into administration. Online competition and posted rental videos had destroyed the business.

2. HMV

The company announced it was filing for adminstration on 15 Jan, overtaken by supermarket and online sales of CDs and DVDs.

3. Jessops

Administration happened on 9 January. Competitors had been supermarkets, smartphone cameras, and internet camera vendors.

4. Comet

Went into administration on 2 November: the sale of TVs and other large appliances have mostly moved online.

5. JJB Sports

Announced administration on 24 September. Rival Sports Direct had wiped it out.

6. Clinton Cards

The company announced administrators were coming in on 9 May. Supermarkets and the internet had started selling greetings cards, and the company couldn't compete.

7. Aquascutum

17 April went into administration. The economic downturn had caused major problems.

HMV filed for administration on on 15 Jan. Photograph: Getty Images
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The most British thing happened when this hassled Piccadilly line worker had had enough

"I try so hard to help you Soph, so hard."

Pity the poor Piccadilly Line. Or rather, pity the poor person who runs its social media account. With the London Underground line running with delays since, well, what seems like forever, the soul behind Transport for London's official @piccadillyline account has been getting it in the neck from all quarters.

Lucky, then, that the faceless figure manning the handle seems to be a hardy and patient sort, responding calmly to tweet upon tweet bemoaning the slow trains.

But everyone has their limit, and last night, fair @piccadillyline seemed to hit theirs, asking Twitter users frustrated about the line to stop swearing at them in tones that brought a single, glittering tear to this mole's eye.

"I do my best as do the others here," our mystery hero pleaded. "We all truly sympathise with people travelling and do the best we can to help them, shouting and swearing at us does nothing to help us helping you."

After another exchange with the angry commuter, @piccadillyline eventually gave up. Their tweet could melt the coldest heart: "Okay, sorry if your tweet mixed up, I won't bother for the rest of my shift. I try so hard to help you Soph, so hard."

Being a mole, one has a natural affinity with those who labour underground, and I was saddened to see poor @piccadillyline reduced to such lows especially so close to Christmas. Luckily, some kind Londoners came to their defence, checking in on the anonymous worker and offering comfort and tea.

And shortly after, all seemed to be well again:

I'm a mole, innit.