December ABC figures: it doesn't look good

Sales all down except for Guardian, Telegraph, Financial Times.

The Guardian, FT and Daily Telegraph all ended 2012 on a high note, with small month-on-month circulation increases. But sales of every other national newspaper were down year on year.

Sales of the UK’s top-selling daily The Sun fell by 10 per cent year on year as it competed with cut-price sales from the previous year, while the Daily Mirror kept its rate of decline to half that figure.

Most of the biggest year on year falls in the Sunday market were due to the distorting effect of the closure of the News of the World in July 2011.

Looking at the sales averages for 2012 as a whole, the Daily Mail and the Daily Mirror were among the best-performing titles in relative terms, keeping their print sales declines to 6 per cent and 6.6 per cent respectively.

UK national newspaper sales for December 2012 (source ABC)

National dailies

Average sale

Month/Month

Year/Year

bulks

Daily Mirror

   1,034,641

-0.99

-5.27

                 -

Daily Record

     250,096

-1.39

-8.89

          1,822

Daily Star

     540,548

-3.47

-12.32

                 -

The Sun

  2,277,809

-3.55

-10.00

                 -

Daily Express

     529,096

-1.52

-11.29

                 -

Daily Mail

   1,844,569

-1.44

-7.54

        91,361

The Daily Telegraph

     547,465

0.19

-6.74

                 -

Financial Times

      286,401

1.60

-14.19

        29,815

The Guardian

     204,222

0.31

-11.25

                 -

i

       291,311

-3.66

31.39

       65,239

The Independent

       78,082

-1.25

-34.69

        18,371

The Scotsman

       32,463

-0.83

-16.00

         2,368

The Times

      396,041

-0.82

-3.18

        17,100

Racing Post

       45,372

-1.70

-9.34

              63

 

 

 

 

 

This story first appeared on Press Gazette.

Year-on-year sales were down for December. Photograph: Getty Images

Dominic Ponsford is editor of Press Gazette

Matt Cardy/Getty Images
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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.