Daily Express redirects searches to owner's lottery

Heavy cross-promotion.

The Daily Express screams from its front page today about "OUTRAGE AS THE NATIONAL LOTTERY DOUBLES PRICE OF TICKETS AND CUTS PRIZES".

The Daily Express, lest you forget, is owned by Richard Desmond, who also owns the Health Lottery, a major competitor to the National Lottery. The proprietor has taken every opportunity for cross-promotion between these two venerable brands, with headlines like NEW LOTTERY TO MAKE BRITAIN BETTER, as well as LOTTO TONIC FOR BRITAIN in its sister paper, the Daily Star.

(The lottery itself has come under fire for giving just 20p in the pound to charity, compared to 28p in the pound from the National Lottery).

But suppose you want to read the Express's story on the National Lottery. It's on the front page of their site, but quite small, and below the fold. You may just find it easier to search for "Lottery" on the main site search. But that won't quite do what you would expect. Go on, try it. See if you find what @ropestoinfinity did when he pointed it out on Twitter.

Searches for "lottery" redirect to the Health Lottery's homepage. There's not even any pretence that they are separate institutions. The Advertising Standards Authority might have something to say about that; but then again, maybe not. Last time they responded to complaints, they pointed out that, since the health lottery and Express are technically different companies, the advertorial wasn't really advertorial. Will the Express get away on a technicality again?

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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What can you do about Europe's refugee crisis?

The death of a three-year-old boy on a beach in Europe has stirred Britain's conscience. What can you do to help stop the deaths?

The ongoing refugee crisis in the Mediterranean dominates this morning’s front pages. Photographs of the body of a small boy, Aylan Kurdi, who washed up on a beach, have stunned many into calling for action to help those fleeing persecution and conflict, both through offering shelter and in tackling the problem at root. 

The deaths are the result of ongoing turmoil in Syria and its surrounding countries, forcing people to cross the Med in makeshift boats – for the most part, those boats are anything from DIY rafts to glorified lilos.

What can you do about it?
Firstly, don’t despair. Don’t let the near-silence of David Cameron – usually, if nothing else, a depressingly good barometer of public sentiment – fool you into thinking that the British people is uniformly against taking more refugees. (I say “more” although “some” would be a better word – Britain has resettled just 216 Syrian refugees since the war there began.)

A survey by the political scientist Rob Ford in March found a clear majority – 47 per cent to 24 per cent – in favour of taking more refugees. Along with Maria Sobolewska, Ford has set up a Facebook group coordinating the various humanitarian efforts and campaigns to do more for Britain’s refugees, which you can join here.

Save the Children – whose campaign director, Kirsty McNeill, has written for the Staggers before on the causes of the crisis – have a petition that you can sign here, and the charity will be contacting signatories to do more over the coming days. Or take part in Refugee Action's 2,000 Flowers campaign: all you need is a camera-phone.

You can also give - to the UN's refugee agency here, and to MOAS (Migrant Offshore Aid Station), or to the Red Cross.

And a government petition, which you can sign here, could get the death toll debated in Parliament. 

 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.