84% of young people get no financial education. That's not the real problem

Financial advisers need it more.

The Chartered Institute for Securities and Investment (CISI) said yesterday that it supported a private member's bill introduced by Thomas Docherty MP to include financial literacy in the national curriculum.

A study in July found that 84 per cent of young people aged 18-25 hadn't received any formal financial education. But it would be interesting to find out how formal financial education affects decision-making: if young people understand basic financial concepts, from inflation and interest rates, to stocks and shares, or how banks operate, will they be less likely to take out payday loans, max out their credit cards or take out unaffordable mortgages? 

You could easily argue that financial training didn't prevent bankers from excessive risk taking. Then again, until this year, financial advisers weren't required to hold more than the equivalent of an A-level in finance.

I remember once speaking to Christopher Jones-Warner, who teaches communication to wealth managers. He said that at his training sessions for financial services personnel he asks attendees to raise their hands if they"have a financial plan" are "working that financial plan" and therefore "expect to retire comfortably." He estimates only around 22 per cent of his audience raise their hands. If professionals aren't planning their finances sensibly, what hope is there for the rest of us?

This makes me wonder, perhaps the problem isn't one of formal financial education, but something more informal and more difficult to teach in a classroom— a question of ethos. It seems to me that it's more important that people are less reckless when it comes to taking on debt, than that they can tell an examiner what a derivative is.

This article first appear on Spear's.

Drive for financial literacy. Photograph: Getty Images

Sophie McBain is a freelance writer based in Cairo. She was previously an assistant editor at the New Statesman.

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Jeremy Corbyn will stay on the Labour leadership ballot paper, judge rules

Labour donor Michael Foster had challenged the decision at the High Court.

The High Court has ruled that Jeremy Corbyn should be allowed to automatically run again for Labour leader after the decision of the party's National Executive Committee was challenged. 

Corbyn declared it a "waste of time" and an attempt to overturn the right of Labour members to choose their leader.

The decision ends the hope of some anti-Corbyn Labour members that he could be excluded from the contest altogether.

The legal challenge had been brought by Michael Foster, a Labour donor and former parliamentary candidate, who maintained he was simply seeking the views of experts.

But when the experts spoke, it was in Corbyn's favour. 

The ruling said: "Accordingly, the Judge accepted that the decision of the NEC was correct and that Mr Corbyn was entitled to be a candidate in the forthcoming election without the need for nominations."

This judgement was "wholly unaffected by political considerations", it added. 

Corbyn said: "I welcome the decision by the High Court to respect the democracy of the Labour Party.

"This has been a waste of time and resources when our party should be focused on holding the government to account.

"There should have been no question of the right of half a million Labour party members to choose their own leader being overturned. If anything, the aim should be to expand the number of voters in this election. I hope all candidates and supporters will reject any attempt to prolong this process, and that we can now proceed with the election in a comradely and respectful manner."

Iain McNicol, general secretary of the Labour Party, said: “We are delighted that the Court has upheld the authority and decision of the National Executive Committee of the Labour Party. 

“We will continue with the leadership election as agreed by the NEC."

If Corbyn had been excluded, he would have had to seek the nomination of 51 MPs, which would have been difficult since just 40 voted against the no confidence motion in him. He would therefore have been effectively excluded from running. 

Owen Smith, the candidate backed by rebel MPs, told the BBC earlier he believed Corbyn should stay on the ballot paper. 

He said after the judgement: “I’m pleased the court has done the right thing and ruled that Jeremy should be on the ballot. This now puts to bed any questions about the process, so we can get on with discussing the issues that really matter."

The news was greeted with celebration by Corbyn supporters.