Five things you didn’t know about Chris Hohn, Britain’s most generous philanthropist

NS business profile of the week.

Charity cards, carol services, collection tins and donate-a-goat-to-Africa gifts are all typical of this season’s charitable nature. Christmas and philanthropy are inseparable and it is therefore the occasion for charities to top up on much needed donations. However, with today’s economic climate, how are charities coping? NS Profile takes a look at one person who has given more than most over recent years. Here are five things you didn’t know about Chris Hohn:

  1.  One of the UK's most successful hedge fund managers, Hohn has donated over £800 million to children's charities since 2003. His Children's Investment Fund Foundation receives direct grants from his hedge fund of the same name. In terms of voluntary income, Children's Investment Foundation receives £2.2 million more than the Donkey Sanctuary.
  2. The notoriously discrete fund manager is worth about £80 million. This makes him one of the most generous British philanthropists when donations are weighed against personal wealth. Bill Clinton once said that Hohn's "marriage of business and philanthropy provides a great tool to effect serious change in the developing world".
  3. One of Hohn's recent "hedging" successes was with News Corp. After the phone hacking scandal broke in 2011, News Corp’s shares were in free fall. Against popular opinion, Hohn brought £500 million worth of shares which are now worth £829 million, a 60 per cent increase.
  4. However, Hohn has not always been as popular in the City as he is with charities. His TCI fund is known for buying large stakes in flagging companies and forcing radical change. During one of his more bitter disputes, Hohn ousted the chief executive of Deutsche Börse, Werner Seifert.
  5. The son of a Jamaican car mechanic, Hohn was rumoured to begin his giving pledge after witnessing child poverty in the Philippines. Since then his hedging success has helped millions of children in the world's poorest countries.
The fund manager is notoriously discrete. Photograph: Getty Images

Oliver Williams is an analyst at WealthInsight and writes for VRL Financial News

Photo: Getty
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Can Philip Hammond save the Conservatives from public anger at their DUP deal?

The Chancellor has the wriggle room to get close to the DUP's spending increase – but emotion matters more than facts in politics.

The magic money tree exists, and it is growing in Northern Ireland. That’s the attack line that Labour will throw at Theresa May in the wake of her £1bn deal with the DUP to keep her party in office.

It’s worth noting that while £1bn is a big deal in terms of Northern Ireland’s budget – just a touch under £10bn in 2016/17 – as far as the total expenditure of the British government goes, it’s peanuts.

The British government spent £778bn last year – we’re talking about spending an amount of money in Northern Ireland over the course of two years that the NHS loses in pen theft over the course of one in England. To match the increase in relative terms, you’d be looking at a £35bn increase in spending.

But, of course, political arguments are about gut instinct rather than actual numbers. The perception that the streets of Antrim are being paved by gold while the public realm in England, Scotland and Wales falls into disrepair is a real danger to the Conservatives.

But the good news for them is that last year Philip Hammond tweaked his targets to give himself greater headroom in case of a Brexit shock. Now the Tories have experienced a shock of a different kind – a Corbyn shock. That shock was partly due to the Labour leader’s good campaign and May’s bad campaign, but it was also powered by anger at cuts to schools and anger among NHS workers at Jeremy Hunt’s stewardship of the NHS. Conservative MPs have already made it clear to May that the party must not go to the country again while defending cuts to school spending.

Hammond can get to slightly under that £35bn and still stick to his targets. That will mean that the DUP still get to rave about their higher-than-average increase, while avoiding another election in which cuts to schools are front-and-centre. But whether that deprives Labour of their “cuts for you, but not for them” attack line is another question entirely. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.

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