Five questions answered on the BAE Systems and Oman contract

BAE wins a deal.

British aerospace company BAE Systems has won a substantial fighter-jet contract with the Sultanate of Oman. We answer five questions on BAE’s Oman contract.

What is the contract for?

Europe’s largest defence contractor BAE Systems has signed a contract with the Sultanate of Oman to supply 12 Typhoon fighter jets and eight Hawk Advanced Jet Trainer aircraft, as well as in-service support. Manufacturing will begin in 2014 with delivery expected in 2017.

How much is the contract worth?

The contract is worth a staggering £2.5 billion.

What does this contract mean in the long term for BAE Systems?

Earlier in the year BAE Systems seemed to be struggling after it failed to close a merger deal with European defence company EADS. Other blows to the company include the US defense budget, where it derives 40 per cent of its earnings, being cut by $600bn (£369bn) and this week the news that it’s contract with Saudi Arabia  for 72 Typhoon fighters has been delayed because of disagreements over the final contract price.

This latest deal will provide a much needed boost to the company and help safeguard 6,000 high-technology and engineering jobs across sites at Warton and Samlesbury in Lancashire, and at Brough in East Yorkshire.

What has BAE Systems said about the deal?

BAE said in statement: "This contract is further recognition that both Typhoon and Hawk are leading aircraft in their class."

What are other people saying about the contract?

According to the BBC Prime Minister David Cameron welcomed the deal, saying:

"It's testament to Britain's leading aerospace industry and the deal will safeguard thousands of jobs across the UK, not just at the BAE Systems factories in Lancashire and East Riding in Yorkshire, but at many more small businesses up and down the country that play a vital role in delivering these aircraft.”

BAE Systems has won a substantial fighter-jet contract with the Sultanate of Oman. Photograph: Getty Images

Heidi Vella is a features writer for Nridigital.com

Matt Cardy/Getty Images
Show Hide image

What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.