Five questions answered on the BAE Systems and Oman contract

BAE wins a deal.

British aerospace company BAE Systems has won a substantial fighter-jet contract with the Sultanate of Oman. We answer five questions on BAE’s Oman contract.

What is the contract for?

Europe’s largest defence contractor BAE Systems has signed a contract with the Sultanate of Oman to supply 12 Typhoon fighter jets and eight Hawk Advanced Jet Trainer aircraft, as well as in-service support. Manufacturing will begin in 2014 with delivery expected in 2017.

How much is the contract worth?

The contract is worth a staggering £2.5 billion.

What does this contract mean in the long term for BAE Systems?

Earlier in the year BAE Systems seemed to be struggling after it failed to close a merger deal with European defence company EADS. Other blows to the company include the US defense budget, where it derives 40 per cent of its earnings, being cut by $600bn (£369bn) and this week the news that it’s contract with Saudi Arabia  for 72 Typhoon fighters has been delayed because of disagreements over the final contract price.

This latest deal will provide a much needed boost to the company and help safeguard 6,000 high-technology and engineering jobs across sites at Warton and Samlesbury in Lancashire, and at Brough in East Yorkshire.

What has BAE Systems said about the deal?

BAE said in statement: "This contract is further recognition that both Typhoon and Hawk are leading aircraft in their class."

What are other people saying about the contract?

According to the BBC Prime Minister David Cameron welcomed the deal, saying:

"It's testament to Britain's leading aerospace industry and the deal will safeguard thousands of jobs across the UK, not just at the BAE Systems factories in Lancashire and East Riding in Yorkshire, but at many more small businesses up and down the country that play a vital role in delivering these aircraft.”

BAE Systems has won a substantial fighter-jet contract with the Sultanate of Oman. Photograph: Getty Images

Heidi Vella is a features writer for Nridigital.com

Photo: Getty
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Who will win the Copeland by-election?

Labour face a tricky task in holding onto the seat. 

What’s the Copeland by-election about? That’s the question that will decide who wins it.

The Conservatives want it to be about the nuclear industry, which is the seat’s biggest employer, and Jeremy Corbyn’s long history of opposition to nuclear power.

Labour want it to be about the difficulties of the NHS in Cumbria in general and the future of West Cumberland Hospital in particular.

Who’s winning? Neither party is confident of victory but both sides think it will be close. That Theresa May has visited is a sign of the confidence in Conservative headquarters that, win or lose, Labour will not increase its majority from the six-point lead it held over the Conservatives in May 2015. (It’s always more instructive to talk about vote share rather than raw numbers, in by-elections in particular.)

But her visit may have been counterproductive. Yes, she is the most popular politician in Britain according to all the polls, but in visiting she has added fuel to the fire of Labour’s message that the Conservatives are keeping an anxious eye on the outcome.

Labour strategists feared that “the oxygen” would come out of the campaign if May used her visit to offer a guarantee about West Cumberland Hospital. Instead, she refused to answer, merely hyping up the issue further.

The party is nervous that opposition to Corbyn is going to supress turnout among their voters, but on the Conservative side, there is considerable irritation that May’s visit has made their task harder, too.

Voters know the difference between a by-election and a general election and my hunch is that people will get they can have a free hit on the health question without risking the future of the nuclear factory. That Corbyn has U-Turned on nuclear power only helps.

I said last week that if I knew what the local paper would look like between now and then I would be able to call the outcome. Today the West Cumbria News & Star leads with Downing Street’s refusal to answer questions about West Cumberland Hospital. All the signs favour Labour. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.