Formula for box-office gold? Make a Bond film that's not a Bond film

Box-office hit.

It's been called the greatest Bond film of all time, and the figures confirm it: Skyfall has broken the UK seven-day box-office record and posted £180m in its first 10 days across the globe.

Why has it done so well? Perhaps because it's not really a Bond film at all. Skyfall has taken a tongue-in-cheek action franchise with a protagonist who is known for his callous nature and has turned it into a gritty drama with a protagonist who struggles with his feelings. It has taken a character who is famous for never falling in love and made him fall. It has taken a formula with strict limits and has made a point of transgressing them. It has surprising bits, sure. But it's easy to be surprising within a franchise if you're going to utterly depart from the blueprint that defines it.

A cheap trick perhaps - but one which has worked with the box office, and the critics. At the moment we love dramas and flawed, human characters, but we also, nostalgically, love James Bond. And this is surely the formula: take a name everyone recognises and put it to the kind of film that is fashionable now. Disney, with their recent purchase of Star Wars might just be on to a winner.

 

Bond, nearly Bond. Photograph: Getty Images

Martha Gill writes the weekly Irrational Animals column. You can follow her on Twitter here: @Martha_Gill.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.