Boris quietly announces 100% rise in bike fares

Bike hike.

A good day to bury bad news. With the eyes of the media fixed on the US, Boris Johnson has quietly released a statement: the cost of using "Boris Bikes" is to double in 2013, accompanying a 4.2 per cent rise for bus and tube fares.

Hiring a bike will now cost £2, buses will be £2.40, and Oyster rates are jumping to £1.40. But Boris claims that he has fought back possibilities of even higher prices, winning £96 m government funding for transport in London.

The funding will go towards expanding travel services - with 600 new buses and 400 new hybrid buses as well as work on the Crossrail system.

Boris Johnson said in a statement: "Before the end of the year I will spell out further investment on the transport network that will help us to provide faster, more frequent and reliable journeys for Londoners; and is crucial to the economic development and growth that is so vital to our great city."

"This fares package is hugely important to our millions of passengers and I am very pleased to have secured nearly £100m that will help to keep fares as low as possible, and protect the important concessions that we offer the most vulnerable Londoners."

 

Boris Johnson announces bike price hike. Photograph: Getty Images
Photo: Getty
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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.