Five questions answered on Cynthia Carroll

CEO steps down.

 

 

Cynthia Carroll today announced she would step down from mining giant Anglo American. We answer five questions on Carroll’s resignation.

Why has Carroll stepped down at this time?

 

Carroll’s official line is that she felt ‘the time was right’. 

 

However, it is believed Carroll has stepped down because of mounting pressure from shareholders who are said to have lost confidence in her strategy and leadership after a sharp drop in profits. 

 

On July 27 Anglo announced that first-half earnings had fallen 46pc to $3.7bn (£2.4bn) which triggered a fall of 3.6pc in the share price.

 

Shareholders are believed to have made the unusual move of going over the head of the chairman of Anglo, Sir John Parker, who had previously rebuffed their concerns, and contacted David Challen, the company's senior independent director, to demand the chairman be overruled and a new Chief Executive found.

 

What has Carroll said? 

 

"I am extremely proud of everything we have achieved during my period as chief executive and I will always retain enormous admiration and affection for this great company and its outstanding people," she said. 

"It is a very difficult decision to leave, but next year I will be entering my seventh year as chief executive and I feel that the time will be right to hand over to a successor who can build further on the strong foundations we have created."

 

What has Anglo said? 

 

"Cynthia's leadership has had a transformational impact on Anglo American. She developed a clear strategy, based on a highly attractive range of core commodities, and created a strong and unified culture and a streamlined organisation with a focus on operational performance."

 

"Her legacy will include, among many other things, a step change improvement in safety, sustainability and the quality of our dialogue with governments, communities and other stakeholders," he added.

 

When will Carroll leave her post? 

 

When a successor has been appointed and a handover has taken place. 

 

What does this mean for the border spectrum of business? 

 

That there are only two women left in charge of Britain’s biggest companies; these are Angela Ahrendts at Burberry and Alison Cooper of Imperial Tobacco. Anglo will now also be looking for a Chief Executive to replace Carroll.

Anglo American is under pressure from shareholders. Photograph: Getty Images.

Heidi Vella is a features writer for Nridigital.com

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Voters are turning against Brexit but the Lib Dems aren't benefiting

Labour's pro-Brexit stance is not preventing it from winning the support of Remainers. Will that change?

More than a year after the UK voted for Brexit, there has been little sign of buyer's remorse. The public, including around a third of Remainers, are largely of the view that the government should "get on with it".

But as real wages are squeezed (owing to the Brexit-linked inflationary spike) there are tentative signs that the mood is changing. In the event of a second referendum, an Opinium/Observer poll found, 47 per cent would vote Remain, compared to 44 per cent for Leave. Support for a repeat vote is also increasing. Forty one per cent of the public now favour a second referendum (with 48 per cent opposed), compared to 33 per cent last December. 

The Liberal Democrats have made halting Brexit their raison d'être. But as public opinion turns, there is no sign they are benefiting. Since the election, Vince Cable's party has yet to exceed single figures in the polls, scoring a lowly 6 per cent in the Opinium survey (down from 7.4 per cent at the election). 

What accounts for this disparity? After their near-extinction in 2015, the Lib Dems remain either toxic or irrelevant to many voters. Labour, by contrast, despite its pro-Brexit stance, has hoovered up Remainers (55 per cent back Jeremy Corbyn's party). 

In some cases, this reflects voters' other priorities. Remainers are prepared to support Labour on account of the party's stances on austerity, housing and education. Corbyn, meanwhile, is a eurosceptic whose internationalism and pro-migration reputation endear him to EU supporters. Other Remainers rewarded Labour MPs who voted against Article 50, rebelling against the leadership's stance. 

But the trend also partly reflects ignorance. By saying little on the subject of Brexit, Corbyn and Labour allowed Remainers to assume the best. Though there is little evidence that voters will abandon Corbyn over his EU stance, the potential exists.

For this reason, the proposal of a new party will continue to recur. By challenging Labour over Brexit, without the toxicity of Lib Dems, it would sharpen the choice before voters. Though it would not win an election, a new party could force Corbyn to soften his stance on Brexit or to offer a second referendum (mirroring Ukip's effect on the Conservatives).

The greatest problem for the project is that it lacks support where it counts: among MPs. For reasons of tribalism and strategy, there is no emergent "Gang of Four" ready to helm a new party. In the absence of a new convulsion, the UK may turn against Brexit without the anti-Brexiteers benefiting. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.