So farewell then, Desperate Dan

Long live Dennis the Menace?

DC Thomson, publisher of The Dandy, has confirmed it will stop printing the comic. After 75 years, The Dandy was one of the world's longest-running children's comics, and is now to go online-only, although the company said it still had "exciting plans" for the title.

Die hard fans will however be sad to see the print version go, which managed to maintain much the same structure for the 75 years of the run. It contrasts here with its most prominent rival The Beano, which has shed many of its original cartoons in favour of more mainstream "boys magazine"  content.

Clearly the latter is the way to go in terms of revenue - just last week The Beano launched a big "Golden Ticket" marketing campaign. Whether original characters like Dennis the Menace and the Bash Street Kids will survive is another question.

The Dandy. Photograph: dandy.com
Photo: Getty
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Gerald Kaufman dies aged 86

Before becoming an MP, Kaufman's varied career included a stint as the NS' theatre critic.

Gerald Kaufman, the Labour MP for Manchester Gorton and former theatre critic at the New Statesman, has died.

Kaufman, who served as the MP for Manchester Gorton continuously from 1970, had a varied career before entering Parliament, working for the Fabian Society in addition to his flourishing career in journalism and as a satirist, writing for That Was The Week That Was and as a leader writer on the Mirror. In 1965, he exchanged the press for politics, working as a press officer and an aide to Harold Wilson before he was elected to parliament in 1970.

Upon Labour’s return to office in 1974, he served as a junior minister until the party’s defeat in 1979, and on the opposition frontbenches until 1992, reaching the position of shadow foreign secretary. In 1999, he was chair of the Man Booker Prize, which that year was won by JM Coetzee’s Disgrace.

His death opens up a by-election in Manchester Gorton, which Labour is expected to win. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.