Strictly business: Swedish "lunch beat"

It's a new craze.

...and the fourth rule of lunch beat is: "You don’t talk about your job at Lunch Beat."  Swedes have started dancing at lunch, offices turning up at discos to bop, with (Swedish) precision, between the hours of 12 and 1. The new craze is dubbed "your week's most important business lunch", but it's strictly not for networking. Instead, the founders say, the session is for the purposes of "playfulness, participation and community," so that workers return to their desks energised and more productive. These wholesome raves have proved a hit, and in 2011, "lunch disco" was adopted as a word by the Swedish Language Council.

According to Slate:

It started in the fall of 2010 when 14 friends decided to dance their lunch breaks away in their office garage. They called their gathering "Lunch Beat". As rumors about this literally underground movement spread, more and more people joined in. Today, Lunch Beat events are being arranged by a core group of organizers at venues around Sweden, attracting up to 600 people each time, and copycat clubs are popping up across Europe.

Lunchbeat sessions are now being held in Serbia, Finland, Germany, Portugal and the UK. The raves are sober - only soft drinks are available, and are said to be particularly popular with ex-ravers who now have kids, can't go out at weekends, and work in middle management.

Photograph: Getty Images
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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.