Other people's business, Thursday 3 May

India, cricket, and unnecessary heart surgery.

1. Pharma needs an injection of financial engineering (Financial Times)

“You’re going to need a bigger boat,” says the police chief played by Roy Scheider in the film Jaws, when he first catches sight of the shark. Faced with cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer’s, we need a bigger investment vehicle, writes John Gapper.

2. Nerds may get revenge on Woodstock of Capitalism (Reuters)

This year’s Woodstock of Capitalism could turn into the revenge of the nerds, writes Agnes Crane.

3. Not cricket (Schumpeter)

How could India possibly fall in love with a different sport? Some enterprising souls think it will, writes Schumpeter.

4. Study: More heart surgery centers mean more unnecessary heart surgery (Washington Post)

There is an "irresistible temptation" on the part of cardiologists to expand narrowed arteries, despite evidence suggesting that they shouldn’t, writes Sarah Kliff.

5. Let News Corp keep BSkyB (Reuters)

News Corporation should be allowed to keep its 39 percent stake in UK pay-TV group BSkyB, writes Chris Hughes.

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Ignoring devolved nations on Brexit "risks breaking up the UK"

Theresa May is meeting with Scottish, Northern Irish and Welsh representatives. 

The Westminster government risks the break up of the union if it tries to impose a Brexit settlement on Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales, the Institute for Government has warned.

On the day Theresa May is meeting with representatives from the devolved administrations, the thinktank said there were "worrying signs" the Tories were ignoring them instead of treating them like partners. 

The Institute urged the UK government to take steps to prevent "political spats from escalating into a full-blow constitutional crisis".

It stated:

"Imposing a Brexit settlement in the absence of consent from the devolved bodies may be legally possible, given that the UK Parliament remains sovereign. 

"However, this would run contrary to convention and to the spirit of devolution, which recognises the right of the three devolved nations to determine their own
form of government. 

"It would also be a reckless strategy for a government committed to the Union, since it would seriously undermine relationships between the four governments, and increase the chances of Scottish independence and rifts in Northern Ireland’s fragile power-sharing arrangements."

Instead, Brexit ministers from the devolved nations should be represented on a specially-created committee and held jointly responsible for the outcome of talks, it recommended. The devolved nations are expected to want a softer Brexit than the one outlined so far by Westminster. 

It noted that despite the Prime Minister's commitment to developing a "UK approach" to Brexit, there are "worrying signs" that the devolved governments are being ignored.

So far key decisions, such as the deadline for triggering Article 50, have been taken by Westminster alone. Legal experts have warned a stand off between devolved authorities and Westminster could lead to a constitutional crisis.

While civil servants across the UK are now trying to work together, the Institute for Government said their ability to do so "has been hindered by lack of agreement at a political level".

A Brexit settlement could also lead to new powers for the devolved nations, the report said, such as on employment and immigration.

The report said it was likely devolved parliaments would wish to vote on any settlement.

The Scottish First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon has already threatened to hold another independence referendum if Westminster does not take account of Scottish interests, and has pledged that the SNP will vote against the Brexit bill in Parliament. 

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.