Other people's business, Wednesday 25 April

Space mining and quitting work.

1. The sort of favours that James Murdoch expects (Financial Times).

Do newspaper proprietors get favourable treatment in business in return for supporting politicians? asks John Gapper.

2. Let’s Quit Together (Freakonomics)

If workers are not alone and allowed to interact with each other, they are more prone to quit at the same time, writes Freakonomics.

3. Space mining plan more than just sci-fi fantasy (Reuters)

Shady corporation sends robot army into space to mine precious metals from asteroids, writes Kevin Allison.

4. Hector’s house was not in order, which is why his legacy is financial fiasco, (Telegraph)

Maybe it's untrue that Hector Sants was named after a mournful-looking basset hound from a 1970s kids programme, writes Alistair Osborne.

5. Spotify’s $4 billion pitch sounds high (Reuters)

Spotify’s pitch to prospective shareholders looks ambitious, writes Quentin Webb.

Space mining? Photograph: Getty Images.
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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.