Business picks from elsewhere, Wednesday 14 March

Our opinion on their opinon: homeless hotspots, Yahoo vs Facebook, and the Americans.

1. Yahoo vs Facebook: Making a tough job harder (Schumpeter)

If you can't beat 'em, sue 'em, writes Schumpeter.

2. Youku-Tudou price pop not only about synergies (Reuters)

If Youku-Tudou kicks off a wave of merger activity, its new high valuation might be justified, writes Wei Gu

3. Fed strikes right balance with latest stress test (Reuters)

The Federal Reserve has found the right balance with its latest round of stress tests, writes Antony Currie.

4. The Americans hate regulations in the abstract, but love them in the particular, (Washington Post)

Contradictions abound in American attitudes, writes Suzy Khimm 

5. On BBH's 'homeless hotspots' (Washington Post)

BBH Labs is taking a fair amount of heat for giving homeless people portable 4G modems, writes Ezra Klein.

 
 
Hotspots, Getty images.
Photo: Getty
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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.