Peaches Geldof comes out on top against 'rent-a-gob' Katie Hopkins on This Morning

‘If you want an example of someone who didn’t grow up with attachment parenting, look no further than the person on my left.'

Peaches Geldof and Katie Hopkins have battled it out over attachment parenting (the theory that a baby should stay as close as possible to the primary caregiver at all times, preferably co-sleeping and being carried in a sling) on This Morning, but it’s clear that Peaches – or ‘Peach cheeks’, as Katie referred to her – came out on top.

The showdown between the 24-year-old mother of two and the woman who Geldof branded a ‘rent-a-gob for the Sun’ was pre-empted by a fierce Twitter exchange, during which Katie Hopkins tweeted a picture of Geldof dropping her baby son Astala and Geldof retaliated with a brilliant invocation of Godwin’s Law: ‘What is next? Hitler being exhumed from his grave, reanimated and allowed as a contestant on the Apprentice or a commentator on ITV??’

Debate about the pros and cons of attachment parenting went personal fairly quickly on the morning show, with Hopkins moving from assertions  that attachment parents ‘sleep in the same beds as their babies because they never grew out of playing with dollies’ and hang around in malodorous clusters of prams at coffee shops (‘When you walk into Costa, you can virtually smell the breast milk’) to barbed attacks on Peaches herself (‘Some people have never really learned to do what they’re told.’)

Geldof shot back with: ‘If you want an example of someone who didn’t grow up with attachment parenting, look no further than the person on my left. This is a prime example of someone who didn’t grow up with attachment parenting: someone who’s cold, who goes on the media to slag off other women, who slags off her own children’. After the programme, she was happy enough with her performance to tweet ‘YOU LOSE, sucka!’ and mentioned that Hopkins had left the studio ‘with her tail between her legs and a traumatised look on her face.’

As someone who had dismissed Peaches’ parenting techniques as ‘all a bit knit-your-own-Birkenstocks’, Katie Hopkins seems to have duly underestimated the debating powers of the second Geldof daughter and, in doing so, bitten off quite a lot more than she could chew. The latest she had to say from her Twitter account @KTHopkins at the time of writing was ‘Enough of the mammary mafia.’

Peaches Geldof and Katie Hopkins on This Morning.

I'm a mole, innit.

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Barack Obama throws a Reaganesque baton of hope to Hillary Clinton

The 44th President's speech backing Clinton was also his swan song. 

Barack Obama looked at ease as he stepped up to praise Hillary Clinton and endorse her as the Democratic Presidential nominee.

To an upbeat soundtrack by U2 and cheers of his 2008 campaign slogan, "yes we can", he took to the podium at the Democratic convention. 

Borrowing the sunny optimism once so skilfully deployed by Republicans, Obama struck back against Republican nominee Donald Trump's "deeply pessimistic vision" of the United States.

He declared: "The America I know is full of courage and optimism and ingenuity. The America I know is decent and generous."

Like his wife Michelle, Obama painted Clinton as a grafter who wasn't in it for the fame. 

He praised her campaign when they were rivals for the Democratic nomination in 2008, and said that when she served as a member of his team he had "a front-row seat" to her intelligence, judgement and discipline. 

He declared: "I can say with confidence there has never been a man or a woman, not me, not Bill, nobody more qualified than Hillary Clinton to serve as president of the United States of America."

He then joked to Bill Clinton, the former President, who was standing applausing: "I hope you don't mind, Bill, but I was just telling the truth, man."

The two-terms President continually urged Democratic voters, many of whom originally backed Bernie Sanders, to get out and vote. "Democracy isn't a spectator sport," he said.

But while Obama was there to add some sparkle to the Clinton campaign, it was also an opportunity to shape his legacy. 

Commentators have often compared Obama to the popular Democratic President John F Kennedy, or the less popular but idealistic Jimmy Carter. 

Obama, though, has in the past praised the Republican President Ronald Reagan for changing the trajectory of US politics. 

In his speech, he borrowed from the "eternal optimist" to compare the Democrats with the Republicans. 

He said: "Ronald Reagan called America "a shining city on a hill." Donald Trump calls it "a divided crime scene" that only he can fix.

"It doesn't matter to him that illegal immigration and the crime rate are as low as they've been in decades, because he's not actually offering any real solutions to those issues. He's just offering slogans, and he's offering fear. He's betting that if he scares enough people, he might score just enough votes to win this election."

Obama praised a diverse country, where immigrant cultures combined: "That is America. That is America. Those bonds of affection, that common creed. We don't fear the future; we shape it, embrace it, as one people, stronger together than we are on our own."

The 44th President bowed out by referring to his 2008 campaign of hope, and telling voters "America, you have vindicated that hope". And he thanked them "for this incredible journey":

"I'm ready to pass the baton and do my part as a private citizen. So this year, in this election, I'm asking you to join me, to reject cynicism and reject fear and to summon what is best in us; to elect Hillary Clinton as the next president of the United States."

There is no doubt that Obama's warm audience was ready to pick up that baton and pass it on. Whether the wider country will be warmed up enough by his Reagan rhetoric remains to be seen. 

You can read the full speech here