Peaches Geldof comes out on top against 'rent-a-gob' Katie Hopkins on This Morning

‘If you want an example of someone who didn’t grow up with attachment parenting, look no further than the person on my left.'

Peaches Geldof and Katie Hopkins have battled it out over attachment parenting (the theory that a baby should stay as close as possible to the primary caregiver at all times, preferably co-sleeping and being carried in a sling) on This Morning, but it’s clear that Peaches – or ‘Peach cheeks’, as Katie referred to her – came out on top.

The showdown between the 24-year-old mother of two and the woman who Geldof branded a ‘rent-a-gob for the Sun’ was pre-empted by a fierce Twitter exchange, during which Katie Hopkins tweeted a picture of Geldof dropping her baby son Astala and Geldof retaliated with a brilliant invocation of Godwin’s Law: ‘What is next? Hitler being exhumed from his grave, reanimated and allowed as a contestant on the Apprentice or a commentator on ITV??’

Debate about the pros and cons of attachment parenting went personal fairly quickly on the morning show, with Hopkins moving from assertions  that attachment parents ‘sleep in the same beds as their babies because they never grew out of playing with dollies’ and hang around in malodorous clusters of prams at coffee shops (‘When you walk into Costa, you can virtually smell the breast milk’) to barbed attacks on Peaches herself (‘Some people have never really learned to do what they’re told.’)

Geldof shot back with: ‘If you want an example of someone who didn’t grow up with attachment parenting, look no further than the person on my left. This is a prime example of someone who didn’t grow up with attachment parenting: someone who’s cold, who goes on the media to slag off other women, who slags off her own children’. After the programme, she was happy enough with her performance to tweet ‘YOU LOSE, sucka!’ and mentioned that Hopkins had left the studio ‘with her tail between her legs and a traumatised look on her face.’

As someone who had dismissed Peaches’ parenting techniques as ‘all a bit knit-your-own-Birkenstocks’, Katie Hopkins seems to have duly underestimated the debating powers of the second Geldof daughter and, in doing so, bitten off quite a lot more than she could chew. The latest she had to say from her Twitter account @KTHopkins at the time of writing was ‘Enough of the mammary mafia.’

Peaches Geldof and Katie Hopkins on This Morning.

I'm a mole, innit.

Grant Shapps on the campaign trail. Photo: Getty
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Grant Shapps resigns over Tory youth wing bullying scandal

The minister, formerly party chairman, has resigned over allegations of bullying and blackmail made against a Tory activist. 

Grant Shapps, who was a key figure in the Tory general election campaign, has resigned following allegations about a bullying scandal among Conservative activists.

Shapps was formerly party chairman, but was demoted to international development minister after May. His formal statement is expected shortly.

The resignation follows lurid claims about bullying and blackmail among Tory activists. One, Mark Clarke, has been accused of putting pressure on a fellow activist who complained about his behaviour to withdraw the allegation. The complainant, Elliot Johnson, later killed himself.

The junior Treasury minister Robert Halfon also revealed that he had an affair with a young activist after being warned that Clarke planned to blackmail him over the relationship. Former Tory chair Sayeedi Warsi says that she was targeted by Clarke on Twitter, where he tried to portray her as an anti-semite. 

Shapps appointed Mark Clarke to run RoadTrip 2015, where young Tory activists toured key marginals on a bus before the general election. 

Today, the Guardian published an emotional interview with the parents of 21-year-old Elliot Johnson, the activist who killed himself, in which they called for Shapps to consider his position. Ray Johnson also spoke to BBC's Newsnight:


The Johnson family claimed that Shapps and co-chair Andrew Feldman had failed to act on complaints made against Clarke. Feldman says he did not hear of the bullying claims until August. 

Asked about the case at a conference in Malta, David Cameron pointedly refused to offer Shapps his full backing, saying a statement would be released. “I think it is important that on the tragic case that took place that the coroner’s inquiry is allowed to proceed properly," he added. “I feel deeply for his parents, It is an appalling loss to suffer and that is why it is so important there is a proper coroner’s inquiry. In terms of what the Conservative party should do, there should be and there is a proper inquiry that asks all the questions as people come forward. That will take place. It is a tragic loss of a talented young life and it is not something any parent should go through and I feel for them deeply.” 

Mark Clarke denies any wrongdoing.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.