Andrew Marr recovering in hospital after suffering a stroke

The presenter is "responding to treatment" after being taken ill on Tuesday, says the BBC.

The BBC announced earlier this evening that Andrew Marr is recovering in hospital after suffering a stroke. In a statement, it said:

Andrew Marr was taken ill yesterday and taken to hospital. The hospital confirmed he has had a stroke. His doctors say he is responding to treatment. His family have asked for their privacy to be respected as he recovers.

We will continue to broadcast The Andrew Marr Show and Radio 4’s Start The Week with guest presenters in his absence. His colleagues and the whole BBC wish him a speedy recovery.”

Acting Director-General, Tim Davie, said: “I am very sorry to hear the news about Andrew. I wish him a speedy recovery and hope to see him back at the BBC soon.

Figures from the world of politics and the media have taken to Twitter to wish the presenter well. Ed Miliband, who is due to appear on The Andrew Marr Show this Sunday, wrote: "My thoughts are with Andrew and his family. Hope he gets well soon."

The New Statesman wishes Andrew a swift and full recovery.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.