Radio boss says hospital hoax not illegal

The station is "incredibly saddened" by death of nurse

Rhys Holleran, head of the Austereo network which owns radio station 2Day FM, has said he is "confident we haven't done anything illegal" in relation to the hoax call to the hospital at which Kate Middleton was treated. A nurse, Jacintha Saldanha, was found dead three days after taking the hoax call from the 2Day FM presenters.

Holleran said: "We are satisfied that the procedures we have in place have been met. Our main concern at this point in time is that what has happened is deeply tragic and we are incredibly saddened and incredibly affected by that... This is a tragic event that could not have reasonably been foreseen and we are deeply saddened by it. 

He added: "I think that prank calls as a craft in radio had been going on for decades. They are done worldwide and no one could have reasonably foreseen what happened."

The King VII hospital where Kate Middleton was treated (Getty Images)
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Could Jeremy Corbyn still be excluded from the leadership race? The High Court will rule today

Labour donor Michael Foster has applied for a judgement. 

If you thought Labour's National Executive Committee's decision to let Jeremy Corbyn automatically run again for leader was the end of it, think again. 

Today, the High Court will decide whether the NEC made the right judgement - or if Corbyn should have been forced to seek nominations from 51 MPs, which would effectively block him from the ballot.

The legal challenge is brought by Michael Foster, a Labour donor and former parliamentary candidate. Corbyn is listed as one of the defendants.

Before the NEC decision, both Corbyn's team and the rebel MPs sought legal advice.

Foster has maintained he is simply seeking the views of experts. 

Nevertheless, he has clashed with Corbyn before. He heckled the Labour leader, whose party has been racked with anti-Semitism scandals, at a Labour Friends of Israel event in September 2015, where he demanded: "Say the word Israel."

But should the judge decide in favour of Foster, would the Labour leadership challenge really be over?

Dr Peter Catterall, a reader in history at Westminster University and a specialist in opposition studies, doesn't think so. He said: "The Labour party is a private institution, so unless they are actually breaking the law, it seems to me it is about how you interpret the rules of the party."

Corbyn's bid to be personally mentioned on the ballot paper was a smart move, he said, and the High Court's decision is unlikely to heal wounds.

 "You have to ask yourself, what is the point of doing this? What does success look like?" he said. "Will it simply reinforce the idea that Mr Corbyn is being made a martyr by people who are out to get him?"